Home Kill

AGN76

Member
Location
north Wales
I've half read enough threads on here to kinda know the answer but - I've just done the school run and 1 of the teachers who is married to a Tunisian wanted to know where she could get a couple of lambs for home slaughter for Eid. I assume she can't?
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
They'd need a CPH to do the movement officially. To be honest though, why would you sell someone a lamb that you knew was going to be killed non-stun, in someones back garden?

Of course, they may choose to butcher them on the farm, where you could supervise if you chose to. You might even learn how little suffering there is if done swiftly and quietly with a sharp knife, likely far less stressful than taking them to a market or abbatoir.

A friend may have done that a few times, and he certainly wouldn’t be concerned about doing it again.
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
Home slaughter is legal subject to the animal being slaughtered humanely provided the animal byproducts are disposed of correctly and the meat is only consumed by those living at the ‘home’

But I believe the law may be a bit different if it is a pet. I assume that's to allow you to grieve by the grave side. Not sure on the law if you only bury a percentage of the corpse though and eat the rest. :oops:
 

neilo

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Montgomeryshire
But I believe the law may be a bit different if it is a pet. I assume that's to allow you to grieve by the grave side. Not sure on the law if you only bury a percentage of the corpse though and eat the rest. :oops:

Some sectors of society don’t leave a lot to dispose of, so my friend tells me. I was fascinated when he told me how ‘they’ prepared each part of the animal for consumption. They’re not all barbarians you know….
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
Some sectors of society don’t leave a lot to dispose of, so my friend tells me. I was fascinated when he told me how ‘they’ prepared each part of the animal for consumption. They’re not all barbarians you know….

You are quite correct and I agree totally. It is always a struggle feeding a lot of dogs so when I saw a cow being delivered to the Lochmaddy abattoir on the Western Isles, I was there first thing to lay claim to the offal. The manager laughed and said, "That's a crofter's cow and the only by-product will be the skin!" (Crofter = small farmer in Scotland). But I believe it is legal to bury pets, just not sure what %age! :ROFLMAO:
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer
You are quite correct and I agree totally. It is always a struggle feeding a lot of dogs so when I saw a cow being delivered to the Lochmaddy abattoir on the Western Isles, I was there first thing to lay claim to the offal. The manager laughed and said, "That's a crofter's cow and the only by-product will be the skin!" (Crofter = small farmer in Scotland). But I believe it is legal to bury pets, just not sure what %age! :ROFLMAO:

I don't think so.

Farmed animals (sheep, cattle, pigs) must be disposed of in an approved method, regardless of pet status.

Horses may be buried as legally they are companion animals not livestock.
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
I don't think so.

Farmed animals (sheep, cattle, pigs) must be disposed of in an approved method, regardless of pet status.

Horses may be buried as legally they are companion animals not livestock.

I stand corrected. I am sure you are right now I think about it. I knew one farmer who lived on the coast. An awful lot of sheep and cattle seemed to disappear over the cliff! I had to be licensed with all the rigmarole of inspections when I fed offal direct from the abattoir (still am, actually).
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
I stand corrected. I am sure you are right now I think about it. I knew one farmer who lived on the coast. An awful lot of sheep and cattle seemed to disappear over the cliff! I had to be licensed with all the rigmarole of inspections when I fed offal direct from the abattoir (still am, actually).

You’re allowed to bury stock where you are anyway @Dry Rot.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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