Loose housing stocking density

Agrivator

Member
What is a good amount of bedded area per cow on an indoor straw pack?
Does the bed get frozen.

Otherwise, as Sid says, the lighter the stocking rate, the less the straw.

If 20 cows need 1 bale of straw daily, 10 cows would only need 1/3 of a bale daily. Part of the reason is that with lighter stocking, the straw bed has more chance to dry out.
 
I’d work on 10 metres squared as a minimum, more for fresh cows or high yielding cows. For every 1000l above 10000, add an extra metre squared.

I believe the Uni of Nottingham study suggests 1.3 metre squared per 1000l yield (total space - loafing and lying).
 
Does the bed get frozen.

Otherwise, as Sid says, the lighter the stocking rate, the less the straw.

If 20 cows need 1 bale of straw daily, 10 cows would only need 1/3 of a bale daily. Part of the reason is that with lighter stocking, the straw bed has more chance to dry out.
No never freezes. Insulated barn with mechanical ventilation year round.
 
I’d work on 10 metres squared as a minimum, more for fresh cows or high yielding cows. For every 1000l above 10000, add an extra metre squared.

I believe the Uni of Nottingham study suggests 1.3 metre squared per 1000l yield (total space - loafing and lying).
10m squared was what we figured but wanted some opinions. Planning a prefresh and fresh cow barn for next year. Going to build for 150% of expected average occupancy. May be overkill but will allow for expansion and calving slugs.
 
10m squared was what we figured but wanted some opinions. Planning a prefresh and fresh cow barn for next year. Going to build for 150% of expected average occupancy. May be overkill but will allow for expansion and calving slugs.
Great call! All the books say 130% for AYR systems as you know you will be overstocked at certain times of the year.

Would be worth thinking about what you are going to do if you expand. To be fair, it’s dry cows that get forgotten about and arguably they are the most significant as getting that transition right is key.
 
Great call! All the books say 130% for AYR systems as you know you will be overstocked at certain times of the year.

Would be worth thinking about what you are going to do if you expand. To be fair, it’s dry cows that get forgotten about and arguably they are the most significant as getting that transition right is key.
We’ve been wanting to do something for years now and another opportunity fell through so now we’ve decided to build a barn purpose built for drys and fresh cows. In my mind the dry period is the start of the lactation so better get it right. We also wanted a dedicated group just for fresh cows to lessen the transition stress.
 
We’ve been wanting to do something for years now and another opportunity fell through so now we’ve decided to build a barn purpose built for drys and fresh cows. In my mind the dry period is the start of the lactation so better get it right. We also wanted a dedicated group just for fresh cows to lessen the transition stress.
Ideal. Don’t underestimate the power of a good ratchet strap, you can put it where you want on one side of a shed depending on how many are close ups and how many are fresh. It’s what they call a stress free calving line. The cows have nose to nose contact with the next group so bullying is reduced.

I’ve seen some people create a loafing yard between two sheds to enable that contact.
 
Location
cumbria
1m² per 100kg.

More room the less straw you will use.
Hang on, it might be a bit early for my maths here.
I've a shed here that's 20x10 so 200m of bedded with a 20x10 scrape and feed area attached, so another 200.

400 total with 250kg calves in it. A 2.5 requirement gives a max stocking of 160 calves.

Where am I calculating it wrong? As it's pretty full with the 35 currently in there.
 

Sid

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
South Molton
I’d work on 10 metres squared as a minimum, more for fresh cows or high yielding cows. For every 1000l above 10000, add an extra metre squared.

I believe the Uni of Nottingham study suggests 1.3 metre squared per 1000l yield (total space - loafing and lying).
I was quoting lying space only. Loafing is additional
Hang on, it might be a bit early for my maths here.
I've a shed here that's 20x10 so 200m of bedded with a 20x10 scrape and feed area attached, so another 200.

400 total with 250kg calves in it. A 2.5 requirement gives a max stocking of 160 calves.

Where am I calculating it wrong? As it's pretty full with the 35 currently in there.
You have a bedded area 20m x10m (66 foot by 33 foot.)

200m² ÷2.5 m² per 250kg animal.
I would estimate 80
Or 33 600kg cows.


Ignore the scrape and feed area.
 

Farmer Fin

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
I’d work on 10 metres squared as a minimum, more for fresh cows or high yielding cows. For every 1000l above 10000, add an extra metre squared.

I believe the Uni of Nottingham study suggests 1.3 metre squared per 1000l yield (total space - loafing and lying).
It’s 1.25m2 of bedded area per 1000l. Less than this was deemed a higher risk for mastitis.
 

dinderleat

Member
Location
Wells
Hang on, it might be a bit early for my maths here.
I've a shed here that's 20x10 so 200m of bedded with a 20x10 scrape and feed area attached, so another 200.

400 total with 250kg calves in it. A 2.5 requirement gives a max stocking of 160 calves.

Where am I calculating it wrong? As it's pretty full with the 35 currently in there.
Is your scrape and feed area covered?
 
Ideal. Don’t underestimate the power of a good ratchet strap, you can put it where you want on one side of a shed depending on how many are close ups and how many are fresh. It’s what they call a stress free calving line. The cows have nose to nose contact with the next group so bullying is reduced.

I’ve seen some people create a loafing yard between two sheds to enable that contact.
We are actually going to have 3 different pens for prefresh cows and one pen for prefresh heifers. Then a large pen for the fresh cows. Ratchet straps sound like a really good idea especially when it comes time to cleaning out. Never tried or seen it done in person so I’d be a bit skeptical.. but will try it I think.
 
What are others trying to do with the scrapings from feed passages?

Do you try to keep straw out and treat it lake slurry or blow a bit of straw over the passage to do that you have something stackable?
 

The new Sustainable Farming Incentive

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The new Sustainable Farming Incentive

Written by Tom Lewis


Source: Natural England

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