Middle Tier GS4

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire

This paragraph needs to be considered when planning grazing (and rent!):

"The sward will be left to rest for at least 5 weeks between 1 May and 31 July, so that the majority of red clover flowers are open and available for pollinators."

This was the main reason I didn't want to claim GS4 on my herbal leys at my last farm as it wouldn't have fitted a mob grazing rotation. As it happened, the gamekeepers managed to persuade the boss to order that we didn't graze it during the bird nesting season then top/graze it in the autumn before he shot partridges over it :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :banghead: We may as well have claimed the GS4 on it after all!
 

unlacedgecko

Member
Livestock Farmer

This paragraph needs to be considered when planning grazing (and rent!):

"The sward will be left to rest for at least 5 weeks between 1 May and 31 July, so that the majority of red clover flowers are open and available for pollinators."

This was the main reason I didn't want to claim GS4 on my herbal leys at my last farm as it wouldn't have fitted a mob grazing rotation. As it happened, the gamekeepers managed to persuade the boss to order that we didn't graze it during the bird nesting season then top/graze it in the autumn before he shot partridges over it :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :facepalm: :banghead: We may as well have claimed the GS4 on it after all!
Daily moves and a 36 day rotation during that period
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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