Moving a hedge

Obtained planning permission to form a new field entrance
Planners requested that hedges be set back slightly for visibility splays (1metre max)
The hedge in question is 10 years old and in good health
Wondering about digging a trench 1 metre wide and o.4 metres deep behind hedge then pushing from the other side with a telescopic just outside the main rooting area with a bucket in vertical position. Will have to be done after Sept 1st ,moving this mass l would have thought to be easier with ground saturated rather than bone dry.
Am l mad?
Interested in your opinions and maybe other more sensible ideas
 

Gedd

Member
Worth a try mightened all take but can replant the gaps have done it here with oak saplings 8/10feet high loosened with teleporter and lifted them out and replanted along side a driveway most of them took
 

Yale

Member
Livestock Farmer
Obtained planning permission to form a new field entrance
Planners requested that hedges be set back slightly for visibility splays (1metre max)
The hedge in question is 10 years old and in good health
Wondering about digging a trench 1 metre wide and o.4 metres deep behind hedge then pushing from the other side with a telescopic just outside the main rooting area with a bucket in vertical position. Will have to be done after Sept 1st ,moving this mass l would have thought to be easier with ground saturated rather than bone dry.
Am l mad?
Interested in your opinions and maybe other more sensible ideas
I’ve done similar and it worked.

To give it best chance do it once the hedge plants are dormant in the winter.
 

robs1

Member
Worth a try mightened all take but can replant the gaps have done it here with oak saplings 8/10feet high loosened with teleporter and lifted them out and replanted along side a driveway most of them took
How much of the root ball did you get out, we have several oaks that have self seeded and want to move them we have a 13 tonne with a decent sized bucket so thought about just digging them straight out and putting it back in a pre dug hole with some nice soil/compost packed in
 

Gedd

Member
How much of the root ball did you get out, we have several oaks that have self seeded and want to move them we have a 13 tonne with a decent sized bucket so thought about just digging them straight out and putting it back in a pre dug hole with some nice soil/compost packed in
That would probably do I rug around with mini digger about 3 feet away from tree
 

Simon Chiles

DD Moderator
How much of the root ball did you get out, we have several oaks that have self seeded and want to move them we have a 13 tonne with a decent sized bucket so thought about just digging them straight out and putting it back in a pre dug hole with some nice soil/compost packed in

We had several pear and plum trees growing where I built an extension on my house. Moved them and a hedge with a 13 tonne excavator. My neighbour said they wouldn’t survive as we did it in the summer, I pointed out to him that we’d moved so much soil with them I doubted they’d realise they’d been moved. Trees and hedge both moved ok and nothing died.
 
How much of the root ball did you get out, we have several oaks that have self seeded and want to move them we have a 13 tonne with a decent sized bucket so thought about just digging them straight out and putting it back in a pre dug hole with some nice soil/compost packed in


We also have similar, and would like to move them as they are below the cover and have no chance of being any good, and will spoil the canopy of the mature tree's around them.

How tall are your self seeded ?
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
How much of the root ball did you get out, we have several oaks that have self seeded and want to move them we have a 13 tonne with a decent sized bucket so thought about just digging them straight out and putting it back in a pre dug hole with some nice soil/compost packed in
although some will disagree , back in may tree growing days we inherited a field of oaks which had been grown for sale and undercut regularly.
However we had to replace a very high percentage of those we sold and we abandoned the rest of them.
if they are your own trees go for it and give them a lot of water in the first couple of years.
Incidentally what you are proposing is against the law. Some ancient law says that oaks must be from approved seed. probably about growing good trees for the navy ;)
Never heard of it being enforced today or in the past or even the penalty probably a couple of groats, or transport to Australia, take your pick😂
 

Werzle

Member
Location
Midlands
Obtained planning permission to form a new field entrance
Planners requested that hedges be set back slightly for visibility splays (1metre max)
The hedge in question is 10 years old and in good health
Wondering about digging a trench 1 metre wide and o.4 metres deep behind hedge then pushing from the other side with a telescopic just outside the main rooting area with a bucket in vertical position. Will have to be done after Sept 1st ,moving this mass l would have thought to be easier with ground saturated rather than bone dry.
Am l mad?
Interested in your opinions and maybe other more sensible ideas
Loads of people do it , best done when they are dormant in the depths of winter. I wouldnt use the telehandler though, just get the 360 bucket under the roots and pull across into the new trench. A fair few cut the hedge down pretty low first so the digger arm can work both sides and the hedge might look sick for abit until the roots start to draw moisture again.
 

robs1

Member
We also have similar, and would like to move them as they are below the cover and have no chance of being any good, and will spoil the canopy of the mature tree's around them.

How tall are your self seeded ?
Vary from about three feet to at least 15, a couple are next to a ditch so have thought about piping a short section and leaving them as they are the biggest ones, also have one on the edge of the farm drive and will need pruning when it gets big to sllow tractors by.
 

robs1

Member
although some will disagree , back in may tree growing days we inherited a field of oaks which had been grown for sale and undercut regularly.
However we had to replace a very high percentage of those we sold and we abandoned the rest of them.
if they are your own trees go for it and give them a lot of water in the first couple of years.
Incidentally what you are proposing is against the law. Some ancient law says that oaks must be from approved seed. probably about growing good trees for the navy ;)
Never heard of it being enforced today or in the past or even the penalty probably a couple of groats, or transport to Australia, take your pick😂
Not sure about Oz but if I got transported to the Alps I might report myself for moving them 😄
 
After you dig the trench, put a foot deep of FYM in before you move the hedge.

Definitely works- put P and K in the trench we (well, the wife I mean) dug by hand for our new hedge. I suggested putting P and K granules or pelleted chicken muck in there before planting the new plants and you would not believe how it has grown in 3 years.
 

robs1

Member
After you dig the trench, put a foot deep of FYM in before you move the hedge.
The only problem is trees and hedges need moving in winter and we now all know you cant apply muck in the autumn let alone winter and even less a foot of the stuff.


Oh hang on just thought of a great idea, dig lots of trenches put all your muck in them, move your hedge into, next year move it all over a few feet, job sorted no more EA issues with your muck
 
The only problem is trees and hedges need moving in winter and we now all know you cant apply muck in the autumn let alone winter and even less a foot of the stuff.


Oh hang on just thought of a great idea, dig lots of trenches put all your muck in them, move your hedge into, next year move it all over a few feet, job sorted no more EA issues with your muck

So manure is banned you say, but you could back the slurry tanker up to the trench and open the fill valve instead?
 

Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

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Update on the Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot

Written by Lisa Applin

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In July, we opened the applications window for farmers to join our Sustainable Farming Incentive pilot.

The Sustainable Farming Incentive is 1 of the 3 new environmental land management schemes. It sits alongside the future Local Nature Recovery and Landscape Recovery schemes.

Through the Sustainable Farming Incentive, farmers will be paid for environmentally sustainable actions – ones that are simple to do and do not require previous agri-environment scheme experience.

We are piloting the scheme to...
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