The Claydon Terrablade

Discussion in 'Direct Drilling Machinery' started by Fat hen, Jun 16, 2017.

  1. Clive

    Clive Staff Member

    Location:
    Lichfield
    I stand by my post - rotation and diversity

    There is nothing new about grassweeds or blackgrass and resistance was created by farmers not nature
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019
    jonnyjon likes this.
  2. Beefsmith

    Beefsmith Member

    It’s not soil health but drainage is a cause. Poorly drained fields or fields with old drainage systems definitely have worse grass weed issues because they like moisture. We have soils with P and K indices of 4. Good pH. Good organic matter levels in wide rotations and they have BG when we put wheat in them once every 5-6 years. We see very little BG in spring barley, short term ley, maize and potatoes.
     
    Feldspar likes this.
  3. tw15

    tw15 Member

    Location:
    DORSET
    I personally think those simba solo type machines that people were all using mixing the top 8 -10 inches of soil haven't helped with blackgrass . I know they say after a few years the seed dies well if the seed is mixed in ten inches of topsoil any thing that you do for the next few years is going to show deep buried seed the light .
    The only way in my book is get the seeds to germinate and kill them .
    For most with serious blackgrass it might mean not cropping a field for a couple of years . Sometimes it would be better to admit defeat and look at the longer picture. How flushes could you get over 2 years lots !
     
  4. clbarclay

    clbarclay Member

    Location:
    Worcestershire
    If you are goign to fallowing a field for two years though, why do you need to stimulate flushes? As long as no new viable weed seed is being added then does it matter if the existing weed seeds are germinated and plants killed or left to loose viability.
     
  5. JD6920s

    JD6920s Member

    Location:
    Shropshire
    What exactly is your rotation these days please ?
     
  6. rob1

    rob1 Member

    Location:
    wiltshire
    doesnt seem to be raised as an issue in organic farming dont they do a fair bit of spring harrowing?
     
  7. tw15

    tw15 Member

    Location:
    DORSET

    Once they are germinated and killed you are 100% sure they gone just waiting and hoping is a mugs game . Same as trying to smother them with cover crops etc .
     
    whiddy likes this.
  8. all_arable

    all_arable Member

    Technically not; resistance was created by nature & just selected for by farmers
     
    Timbo1080 likes this.
  9. Clive

    Clive Staff Member

    Location:
    Lichfield
    I don’t have a fixed one as such but it has a basic principle of no second cereals and 40% spring break cropping established into over winter yet covers

    We grow up to 9 different combinable crops plus the multi species cover crops ........ diversity
     
  10. DieselRob

    DieselRob Member

    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    What area (%) of your various crops do you grow now? And what were you before?
     
  11. Clive

    Clive Staff Member

    Location:
    Lichfield
    the % is not fixed, other than the 50% first wheat and 10% OSR - the rest is whatever spring break best suits that year / markets / weather / block of land etc

    pre my conservation ag approach I grew wheat. rape and small area of beans maybe a bit of barley occasionally. usualy all autumn established
     
    DieselRob likes this.
  12. rob1

    rob1 Member

    Location:
    wiltshire
    Over winter cover crops are fine on dry ground but on heavy soils in wet parts of the country they dont work unless you can destroy them early and allow them to die back to let the soil warm and dry on top, we have used sheep to graze them down but they can do a lot of damage in wet spells
     
  13. Clive

    Clive Staff Member

    Location:
    Lichfield
    don't have sheep then

    plenty of people quite successfully using conservation ag on VERY heavy soil. Its certainly not a one size fits all approach or solution however that much is true, some use cover crops and some don't. It's what works on you farm that matters
     
  14. ajd132

    ajd132 Member

    Location:
    Suffolk
    Do you lower you’re contracting charge on CFA’s for reduced output? I thought you said you were unashamedly expensive, if so that doesn’t make much sense.
     
  15. MJB

    MJB Member

    Location:
    Suffolk
    Copy of an extract from the "Practical Hints from the Notebook of an Old Farmer" written in 1914 by William Dannant from Great Waltham in Essex.


    They've been battling black grass for over a century!




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