Vet charges for castrations of cattle

beefandsleep

Member
Location
Staffordshire
In the past I’ve done it with Stanley blade and anaesthetic but I don’t think that would be legal these days. They flinch more from the jab than the knife. I assume you are talking about older cattle too big to ring.
 

delilah

Member
Had vet do one recently, three figure sum, was a retained testicle that hadn't been able to get a ring over. All of our vet bills seem eye watering but what can you do ?
 

MRT

Member
You guys need to get a few horses. £350 to £250. (Changed the vet after the first!).
Every single horse in the history of castration seems to require a midnight revisit as its still bleeding! (Its usually not). Strangely, the horse types don't find any comfort in the fact that bloodloss is always self limiting!
 

beefandsleep

Member
Location
Staffordshire
Had vet do one recently, three figure sum, was a retained testicle that hadn't been able to get a ring over. All of our vet bills seem eye watering but what can you do ?
Possibly be better to rear those odd ones as bulls considering the cost. Used to be rare to get vet to carry out minor procedures, stockmen were expected to be competent at such things. Everyone seems to go to college these days, what are they teaching them?
 

ERL

Member
Is that legal...?
Good question. Anyone know the answer? He's done it (hot irons method) for about 40yrs without any problems. They rarely bat an eylid as he's very good with cattle. IMO much better than 'twist and pull' method some vets use.
 

delilah

Member
Possibly be better to rear those odd ones as bulls considering the cost. Used to be rare to get vet to carry out minor procedures, stockmen were expected to be competent at such things. Everyone seems to go to college these days, what are they teaching them?
Agreed for a normal farm, we have lots of novices helping out, one bull on the place is enough to manage elf and safety with lol.
 

Pan mixer

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Near Colchester
Agreed for a normal farm, we have lots of novices helping out, one bull on the place is enough to manage elf and safety with lol.
I too had a calf with a retained testicle that couldn't be ringed, same vet I suspect, extra £100 odd quid on the bill when he came for his inspection next
 

AndrewM

Member
BASIS
Location
Devon
Good question. Anyone know the answer? He's done it (hot irons method) for about 40yrs without any problems. They rarely bat an eylid as he's very good with cattle. IMO much better than 'twist and pull' method some vets use.
Castration Under the Protection of Animals (Anaesthetics) Act 1954, as amended, it is an offence to castrate calves which have reached two months of age without the use of an anaesthetic.
Furthermore, the use of a rubber ring, or other device, to restrict the flow of blood to the scrotum, is only permitted without an anaesthetic if the device is applied during the first week of life.
Under the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966, as amended, only a veterinary surgeon may castrate a calf which has reached the age of two months.

116 Stock-keepers should consider carefully whether castration is necessary.
If it is necessary, there are three methods which can be used to castrate calves:
• a rubber ring or other device, which can only be used in the first seven days of life, by a trained and competent stock-keeper, to restrict the flow of blood to the scrotum;
• bloodless castration, by a trained and competent stock-keeper, by crushing the spermatic cords of calves less than 2 months old, with a burdizzo;
• castration by a veterinary surgeon, using an anaesthetic.
 
Tags
calf

In conversation with a soil health pioneer

  • 255
  • 3


In conversation with a soil health pioneer

Written by Janet Hughes



https://www.buzzsprout.com/1657363/8311877-janet-hughes-and-gabe-brown-the-six-principles-of-soil-health.mp3

In this month's Future Farming podcast, Janet Hughes talks to Gabe Brown.

Gabe has been named one of the twenty-five most influential agricultural leaders in the United States. He farms at...
Top