What qualifictions do you have?

True North

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Yorkshire
New to farming - sort of.

Just wondering how many of you out there have sought to do any type of qualifications as a farmer. Are you a young farmer or a mature farmer.

Do you think it's necessary?

What qualification would you recommend and why?

I'm a mature farmer coming into it and I just wondered if there was something that would be helpful.
 

Farmer_Joe

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
The North
read up on stuff,

the ADHB has loads of stuff on sheep illness and feeding techniques i have read, also other books too, i also listen to everyone's advice (you dont have to take it and i often dont but its worth listening too!!) then form my own way though with the knowledge ive read heard. this forum is useful for info too.
 

True North

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Yorkshire
read up on stuff,

the ADHB has loads of stuff on sheep illness and feeding techniques i have read, also other books too, i also listen to everyone's advice (you dont have to take it and i often dont but its worth listening too!!) then form my own way though with the knowledge ive read heard. this forum is useful for info too.

Thanks for that, I shall have a look.

Yes I agree, invaluable having someone to sound ideas out with, even if remotely.
 

melted welly

Member
Location
DD9.
New to farming - sort of.

Just wondering how many of you out there have sought to do any type of qualifications as a farmer. Are you a young farmer or a mature farmer.

Do you think it's necessary?

What qualification would you recommend and why?

I'm a mature farmer coming into it and I just wondered if there was something that would be helpful.
patience, tenacity and be open to new ideas. Business qualification be useful grounding. Can learn the rest from peer/ independent advisors. Be wary of advice from those selling the “solution”.
 

True North

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Yorkshire
patience, tenacity and be open to new ideas. Business qualification be useful grounding. Can learn the rest from peer/ independent advisors. Be wary of advice from those selling the “solution”.
I suppose it's the actual farming bit and animal/land responsibilities i'm pondering about, but there are tons of resources out there to read up on.

I feel OK about the business/paperwork side to it, I suppose like much in life, you learn on the job.
 

True North

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Yorkshire
Currently MD a uk subsidiary of a machinery manufacture .
2 a levels
11 gce....
It’s not always paper that gets you through life!
No, I know and I know from experience that for farming there is a depth of experience to be had from working the land and animals and doing a good job at it.

I have zero qualifications in this area so I will have to go with common sense and trial and error.

I just wondered as I knoww there is a lot for young farmers but what if you aren't that young and are going to be farming?
 

N.Yorks.

Member
BASIS courses maybe.

Do your best to learn about soil science, plant science, agri ecology, keep abreast of DEFRA schemes as these will influence whether you make any money or not! Understand Natural Capital and don't presume you need to produce as much as possible, you'll need to produce at the best gross margin and that may well not be aligned with maximum output and in the future may well not be always aligned to producing food. Forget being a farmer and see yourself as a land manager.... (you can still say you're a farmer!)
 

True North

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Yorkshire
Will have a look at the basis courses-cheers.

I aren't looking at qualifications by way of being a 'qualified' farmer...I know that many farmers would rightly scoff at the suggestion and I would agree.

My question comes more from a place of 'what the jeff should i be doing' and is there a resource out there to inform me a bit more I suppose.

I've seen the DEFRA and will be keeping on with their schemes. I think OU are offering some free courses which might cover a bit of soil science.
 

melted welly

Member
Location
DD9.
I suppose it's the actual farming bit and animal/land responsibilities i'm pondering about, but there are tons of resources out there to read up on.

I feel OK about the business/paperwork side to it, I suppose like much in life, you learn on the job.
Depends on the size of your operation, might make most sense to keep on top of running the business and pay someone to do the practical side, can learn from them at same time
 

True North

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Yorkshire
Depends on the size of your operation, might make most sense to keep on top of running the business and pay someone to do the practical side, can learn from them at same time
Yeah we have been considering shared farming as a way of doing that, but I think we may well end up just going for it and start small and see how we go. We may as well learn now as wait 3 years.
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
So much depends on your circumstances. Telehandler, chainsaw, various PA’s etc. are necessities for some practical work. Formal ones like NDA, HND etc would be needed to take on a tenancy. Common sense, practical experience and the ability to listen to advice would be needed if inheriting.
 

melted welly

Member
Location
DD9.
Yeah we have been considering shared farming as a way of doing that, but I think we may well end up just going for it and start small and see how we go. We may as well learn now as wait 3 years.
I didn’t mean take on a full time employee, more that there will be contractors, one man bands, neighbours who’ll be there to help.
 

True North

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Yorkshire
Telehandler? What is that please?

Some stuff we would have to contract out without a doubt,

There's no requirement for me to do this, just a curiosity of whats out there for beginners.
 

Early moves to target wild oats

  • 543
  • 0
Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

1617958650096.png


Miss Wood urges...
Top