BLOCK PAVING USED IN FARMS IN GERMANY AND HOLLAND?

bluebell

Member
i noticed that alot of farms abroad, germany and holland use block paving in their farmyards, yards? Ive never seen this in the UK on farms here, why is this, plenty of concrete used here? I put some down here last week with steel mesh in it, Dutch friends on here please comment or germans if you have to?
 

chaffcutter

Moderator
Arable Farmer
Location
S. Staffs
A neighbour block paved a new farmyard some years ago but last time I was there I thought it was becoming a bit uneven, but it’s had a lot of heavy traffic so not sure how it would compare with concrete. I suppose areas could be lifted out, filled and relaid without having to do it all, so could well be cost effective?

We have just laid a new yard and for lorry traffic it’s 200mm thick with full mesh reinforcement, so that’s not cheap either!
 

Gerbert

Member
Location
Dutch biblebelt
Lots overhere, here on the sand it's 95 percent or more block paving, on peat and clay concrete plates or more popular, asphalt is popular on softer ground aswell as it has a bit of give.
Poured concrete is rare.
For me it is down to cost, if you know the right people it is not hard to get used ones for free or little money, you just need a little patience.
Hardcore yards like you guys seem to have alot I have only ever seen on temporary basis.
 

robin banks

Member
Location
Ireland
Planning permission requirement I was told when on a dairy tour of Holland. Also had to redbrick the outside walls. Their dairy sheds were to a higher astetic standard then industrial units would be in UK or Ireland. Adding hugely to the cost. One farm I was on had to pile drive the base before they built the slatted tank due to being on sand. That guy spent 700k on his 40 cow unit. Most units were after spending 600k for 100 cows to 1.2m for 200 cow. And that was about 10 years ago. All borrowed at 1 percent above base over 20 to 30 years. You could see each generation spent big once in there farming career then next generation replaced all with new technology
 

glasshouse

Member
Location
lothians
Planning permission requirement I was told when on a dairy tour of Holland. Also had to redbrick the outside walls. Their dairy sheds were to a higher astetic standard then industrial units would be in UK or Ireland. Adding hugely to the cost. One farm I was on had to pile drive the base before they built the slatted tank due to being on sand. That guy spent 700k on his 40 cow unit. Most units were after spending 600k for 100 cows to 1.2m for 200 cow. And that was about 10 years ago. All borrowed at 1 percent above base over 20 to 30 years. You could see each generation spent big once in there farming career then next generation replaced all with new technology
Who lends them money at 1% over base?
 

Danllan

Member
Location
Sir Gar / Carms
Where I was brought up in Herts we had some old stables and sheds with brick floors. The small yard between them was also bricked.

The larger sheds - old ones - had pounded chalk and flints under, the chalk being scraped and replaced periodically.
 

glasshouse

Member
Location
lothians
i noticed that alot of farms abroad, germany and holland use block paving in their farmyards, yards? Ive never seen this in the UK on farms here, why is this, plenty of concrete used here? I put some down here last week with steel mesh in it, Dutch friends on here please comment or germans if you have to?
Block paving will be safer for cattle
 
I notice that quite a big part of Woodhead's yard in Colne is block paved and seems to stand up to triple axle units and triple axle trailers doing virtually 90 degree turns on them , doesn't seem to bother the blocks apart from a very few shallow puddles . I also notice that the newer parts are concreted , but whether that's cost or expediency , or practicality I don't know .
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
Funnily enough just watched 'Enemy at the door,' on talking pictures, opening with a view up a tree lined block paved road, somewhere in Belgium i think possibly.?

They just don't make telly like that any more.
 

Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

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Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
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