Combining 2 Windrows With A Hay Bob?

TrickyT

Member
How do you combine 2 windrows with a 2 wheel hay bob? I am using a Ferguson TEF with a generic hay bob which puts the windrow to the left as you travel looking from behind.

Tried several times and I seem to have to take 4 attempts to make 2 into 1?

I go round in an anti clockwise direction, then on the next run position the right hand (looking from behind) hay bob so the tines just overlap where the clean area is.

This then leaves a wide gap between the 2 windrows.

Now to combine them, I have then gone with the left hand front wheel on the outside of the first windrow I created, which moves it over to the left, but doesn't touch any of the 2nd windrow.

Then I go around again and position the tractor so the left hand (from behine) tines are moving the windrow over to the right.

I then repeat this, but it probably takes another 2 passes to bring it together into one. So a total of 4 passes to combine 2 windrows into 1, it that right?

Trevor
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
How do you combine 2 windrows with a 2 wheel hay bob? I am using a Ferguson TEF with a generic hay bob which puts the windrow to the left as you travel looking from behind.

Tried several times and I seem to have to take 4 attempts to make 2 into 1?

I go round in an anti clockwise direction, then on the next run position the right hand (looking from behind) hay bob so the tines just overlap where the clean area is.

This then leaves a wide gap between the 2 windrows.

Now to combine them, I have then gone with the left hand front wheel on the outside of the first windrow I created, which moves it over to the left, but doesn't touch any of the 2nd windrow.

Then I go around again and position the tractor so the left hand (from behine) tines are moving the windrow over to the right.

I then repeat this, but it probably takes another 2 passes to bring it together into one. So a total of 4 passes to combine 2 windrows into 1, it that right?

Trevor

Find a combine with a 10 foot header 😉.

Difficult to advise when we don’t know the gaps between windrows.
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
Hay or straw?
I have an ancient DEUTZ-FAHR KU 250 hay bob. It makes a decent job of rowing up. I was doing that last week. Up one swath, turn at the end, and down on the next. Pushing each row in towards the centre to make one row. I don't go round and round but up and down, then put the ends on.

But that's rows made from spread hay, so each a distance from the next perfect for putting two rows into one.

Get yourself a tape measure and a piece of paper and work it out for what suits you. If the rows are too far apart, you won't put two into one in two passes.
 

335d

Member
Angle the gates so it puts the row to the right. You’ll see pictures on the Kuhn website. They show then moving the gates to the middle when combining the two rows, which you could do after you have all the small rows made.


20709C9F-A587-45E4-831C-FBBF2FB9D317.png
 

TrickyT

Member
A picture paints a thousand words! Many thanks.

I go up and down in the same anticlockwise direction, so it looks like I the place the windrows too far apart?

In the bottom right of the picture, I would have run with my front right hand wheel on the outside of the windrow, but that shows the wheel running on it. Maybe thats why I am not getting them close together.

Having the gates as shown makes perfect sense.

Regards

Trevor
 

glasshouse

Member
Location
lothians
How do you combine 2 windrows with a 2 wheel hay bob? I am using a Ferguson TEF with a generic hay bob which puts the windrow to the left as you travel looking from behind.

Tried several times and I seem to have to take 4 attempts to make 2 into 1?

I go round in an anti clockwise direction, then on the next run position the right hand (looking from behind) hay bob so the tines just overlap where the clean area is.

This then leaves a wide gap between the 2 windrows.

Now to combine them, I have then gone with the left hand front wheel on the outside of the first windrow I created, which moves it over to the left, but doesn't touch any of the 2nd windrow.

Then I go around again and position the tractor so the left hand (from behine) tines are moving the windrow over to the right.

I then repeat this, but it probably takes another 2 passes to bring it together into one. So a total of 4 passes to combine 2 windrows into 1, it that right?

Trevor
Your hay will be reduced to chaff
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
I did not do a lot of work with a “Haybob” but were there not 2 distinct types and some were never made to use as a side rake where as others could be.
you can never work hay too much, unless it has clover in it. If your hay is dusty , it is because it was baled too damp, not allowed to dry innthe bale and stored with insufficient ventilation. The old dutch barns were the best as they allow air from all sides.
If your windrow is not big enough and even enough, you will get some very poor bales, often lacking density. Travelling too fast especially on rough ground to compensate will risk other issuea.
 

essexpete

Member
Location
Essex
I did not do a lot of work with a “Haybob” but were there not 2 distinct types and some were never made to use as a side rake where as others could be.
you can never work hay too much, unless it has clover in it. If your hay is dusty , it is because it was baled too damp, not allowed to dry innthe bale and stored with insufficient ventilation. The old dutch barns were the best as they allow air from all sides.
If your windrow is not big enough and even enough, you will get some very poor bales, often lacking density. Travelling too fast especially on rough ground to compensate will risk other issuea.
Hay can be dusty due to grass types I believe.
 

335d

Member
I did not do a lot of work with a “Haybob” but were there not 2 distinct types and some were never made to use as a side rake where as others could be.
you can never work hay too much, unless it has clover in it. If your hay is dusty , it is because it was baled too damp, not allowed to dry innthe bale and stored with insufficient ventilation. The old dutch barns were the best as they allow air from all sides.
If your windrow is not big enough and even enough, you will get some very poor bales, often lacking density. Travelling too fast especially on rough ground to compensate will risk other issuea.

a haybob 360 is a side delivery rake and can achieve what the op asked in two passes. The pictures I posted above are of a centre delivery haybob 300, which shows how to put two rows into one with 3 passes.This should be possible with the older 275 as well I would of thought.
We find it better, driving slower with a bigger row, rather than trying to up the ground speed on bumpy ground.
 

Flat 10

Member
Location
Fen Edge
a haybob 360 is a side delivery rake and can achieve what the op asked in two passes. The pictures I posted above are of a centre delivery haybob 300, which shows how to put two rows into one with 3 passes.This should be possible with the older 275 as well I would of thought.
We find it better, driving slower with a bigger row, rather than trying to up the ground speed on bumpy ground.
When I have done it just as in the pictures I have used it as a tedding pass.
 

glasshouse

Member
Location
lothians
I did not do a lot of work with a “Haybob” but were there not 2 distinct types and some were never made to use as a side rake where as others could be.
you can never work hay too much, unless it has clover in it. If your hay is dusty , it is because it was baled too damp, not allowed to dry innthe bale and stored with insufficient ventilation. The old dutch barns were the best as they allow air from all sides.
If your windrow is not big enough and even enough, you will get some very poor bales, often lacking density. Travelling too fast especially on rough ground to compensate will risk other issuea.
Dont tslk about haybobs if you havent used them, and hay can be ruined by overturning it
Literally turned to chaff
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
Dont tslk about haybobs if you havent used them, and hay can be ruined by overturning it
Literally turned to chaff
If you look at the original post it talks about a generic hay bob, this can in many peoples eyes mean anything with horizontal rotors towed behind a tractor.
The one in the diagram the rotors can only turn in one direction sweeping the grass in through the middle. Other machines can do this , but also by changing a gear, both rotors Can turn one way raking grass to left normally I think. This will give the option of clearing up to 7 metres in one bout across a field into a single swath.
we used to make Over 200 acres a year of hay And worked on the principle that it should never sit still and sometime making hay with in 24 hours in good weather. It only turns to chaff when it has been sitting in the sun too long
 

CHAP Webinar - Innovative tools to overcome the challenges of Regen Ag

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