Front Weights

Ukjay

Member
Location
Wales!
Hi,

Forgive my ignorance, but is there a guideline in how you calculate the weight required on the front of a tractor to help balance the load - or is it simply what goes on the back gets replicated on the front, as I am gonna need to look into this?
 

Phil P

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North West
Hi,

Forgive my ignorance, but is there a guideline in how you calculate the weight required on the front of a tractor to help balance the load - or is it simply what goes on the back gets replicated on the front, as I am gonna need to look into this?
There should be a guide in your operators manual on how to ballast the tractor correctly.
 

holwellcourtfarm

Member
Livestock Farmer
Hi,

Forgive my ignorance, but is there a guideline in how you calculate the weight required on the front of a tractor to help balance the load - or is it simply what goes on the back gets replicated on the front, as I am gonna need to look into this?
Quick answer: put your machine on, add front weights until you can't get the front wheels to lift by quickly dropping the clutch in a low gear.

Long answer: Basic physics. The weight added to the back multiplied by the distance of it from the back axle needs to be the equivalent to the weight added to the front multiplied by the distance of those weights from the back axle. Because the front weights are much further from the back and it takes less weight on the front to counter the added weight on the back (unless it's a fully mounted 6 furrow plough which sticks out such a long way behind).

The more weight you add overall (ie: total ballasted weight of the combination) the more soil compaction you'll cause.
 

icanshootwell

Member
Location
Ross-on-wye
Quick answer: put your machine on, add front weights until you can't get the front wheels to lift by quickly dropping the clutch in a low gear.

Long answer: Basic physics. The weight added to the back multiplied by the distance of it from the back axle needs to be the equivalent to the weight added to the front multiplied by the distance of those weights from the back axle. Because the front weights are much further from the back and it takes less weight on the front to counter the added weight on the back (unless it's a fully mounted 6 furrow plough which sticks out such a long way behind).

The more weight you add overall (ie: total ballasted weight of the combination) the more soil compaction you'll cause.
Most don,t care about compaction or don,t see it as a problem.
 

Ukjay

Member
Location
Wales!
There should be a guide in your operators manual on how to ballast the tractor correctly.

Yes, I did read through that, however - it is more aligned for calculating the wheel slippage for best traction whilst utilising implements that you are towing / dragging / ploughing. I am looking more for guidance on countering the weight on the back for say my PN whilst moving from point to point, as it does cause some light steering when manouvering.
 

Ukjay

Member
Location
Wales!
Quick answer: put your machine on, add front weights until you can't get the front wheels to lift by quickly dropping the clutch in a low gear.

Long answer: Basic physics. The weight added to the back multiplied by the distance of it from the back axle needs to be the equivalent to the weight added to the front multiplied by the distance of those weights from the back axle. Because the front weights are much further from the back and it takes less weight on the front to counter the added weight on the back (unless it's a fully mounted 6 furrow plough which sticks out such a long way behind).

The more weight you add overall (ie: total ballasted weight of the combination) the more soil compaction you'll cause.

This is where I am looking for our use, as it is the counter side I am looking to use, and was trying to see if there is a quick ref / simple experienced guide vs getting the books out to do the angle of the dangle maths / fulcrums etc.
 

roscoe erf

Member
Livestock Farmer
Yes, I did read through that, however - it is more aligned for calculating the wheel slippage for best traction whilst utilising implements that you are towing / dragging / ploughing. I am looking more for guidance on countering the weight on the back for say my PN whilst moving from point to point, as it does cause some light steering when manouvering.
6 50kg wafer weights
 

Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
Get your tyre supplier to bring the plate weigher and do it right
You will find what you need to hold it down when implement up will over load front axle and take weight off back when it’s down
So need wheel weights in back or sliding counter weight on front to get right balance
Then tyre pressures next
 

Ukjay

Member
Location
Wales!
Thank you. I'm here all week month year :notworthy:

Sorry. Do you have a farm with a weigh bridge locally? Most add ballast by trial & error.
No need to apologise - I took it in the way it was intended, I'm not that old and miserable yet 😉

Not sure about weigh bridge to be honest - but I'll sort something out by hook or by crook, as I got a hist of some points from here that will help.
Weights hold their price well though, so gonna need to earn some more pennies to make the pounds to get them 👍
 

snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
Ha Ha
I've had 2.4 tonnes in a mounted spinner and didn't realise I had forgotten the modest weight we hang on the front linkage until I had done the first load. Don't really need any weight for a 6m Kuhn folding PH, although we do fit it if doing any road travel.
Empty, there is more weight over the front axle than the rear.
A front mounted flail requires a weight on the back to feel safe.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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