Frost intolerant covers

farmerfred86

Member
BASIS
Location
Suffolk
Im considering a winter cover of frost intolerant species. Likely to be buckwheat, phacelia, linseed etc

The idea is to provide cover into winter but leave the field clear for spring drilling without the need for destruction. I find it essential on heavy clays to get the land to dry out ready for spring drilling.
I know this has some downsides but hope it could provide the right level of cover for the right amount of time. Any thoughts?
 

farmerfred86

Member
BASIS
Location
Suffolk
Interesting idea, weed control in the cover crop was my first question.
If its thick enough it will likely suppress most weeds but weeds and volunteers that survive to spring will obviously need roundup. In a perfect world we wouldn't require anything. Spraying off in March isn't a problem, spraying off in December is (can be).
 
Im considering a winter cover of frost intolerant species. Likely to be buckwheat, phacelia, linseed etc

The idea is to provide cover into winter but leave the field clear for spring drilling without the need for destruction. I find it essential on heavy clays to get the land to dry out ready for spring drilling.
I know this has some downsides but hope it could provide the right level of cover for the right amount of time. Any thoughts?
Well, I have Phacelia planted last Autumn and is now 600mm high, after -8C nights. Went a bit blue and then shrugged off the cold... Linseed less so, but still got a reasonable population, probs spring variety,
 
If its thick enough it will likely suppress most weeds but weeds and volunteers that survive to spring will obviously need roundup. In a perfect world we wouldn't require anything. Spraying off in March isn't a problem, spraying off in December is (can be).
Crimper? Not that they seem to be the panacea that was hoped for. Easier to whip through with a boom...
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Buckwheat is killed by a ground frost. Mine was gone in October. Phacelia is supposed to be frost intolerant but I have had to spray it off every year, along with the linseed & volunteers from the previous crops. A sharp frost gives it a good kicking, but doesn't seem to finish the job.
 
Buckwheat is killed by a ground frost. Mine was gone in October. Phacelia is supposed to be frost intolerant but I have had to spray it off every year, along with the linseed & volunteers from the previous crops. A sharp frost gives it a good kicking, but doesn't seem to finish the job.
Got down to -7C and the Phacelia turned blue... However, much to my surprise, it is now nearly 2ft high in places in a B&B mix.... Now we have had some rain, it'll romp away. Wondering what to do next Spring already, will it shed enough seed to give a "crop" in 22/23 with just some suppemental seed DD in next Spring?
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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