Frost intolerant covers

farmerfred86

Member
BASIS
Location
Suffolk
Im considering a winter cover of frost intolerant species. Likely to be buckwheat, phacelia, linseed etc

The idea is to provide cover into winter but leave the field clear for spring drilling without the need for destruction. I find it essential on heavy clays to get the land to dry out ready for spring drilling.
I know this has some downsides but hope it could provide the right level of cover for the right amount of time. Any thoughts?
 

farmerfred86

Member
BASIS
Location
Suffolk
Interesting idea, weed control in the cover crop was my first question.
If its thick enough it will likely suppress most weeds but weeds and volunteers that survive to spring will obviously need roundup. In a perfect world we wouldn't require anything. Spraying off in March isn't a problem, spraying off in December is (can be).
 
Im considering a winter cover of frost intolerant species. Likely to be buckwheat, phacelia, linseed etc

The idea is to provide cover into winter but leave the field clear for spring drilling without the need for destruction. I find it essential on heavy clays to get the land to dry out ready for spring drilling.
I know this has some downsides but hope it could provide the right level of cover for the right amount of time. Any thoughts?
Well, I have Phacelia planted last Autumn and is now 600mm high, after -8C nights. Went a bit blue and then shrugged off the cold... Linseed less so, but still got a reasonable population, probs spring variety,
 
If its thick enough it will likely suppress most weeds but weeds and volunteers that survive to spring will obviously need roundup. In a perfect world we wouldn't require anything. Spraying off in March isn't a problem, spraying off in December is (can be).
Crimper? Not that they seem to be the panacea that was hoped for. Easier to whip through with a boom...
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Buckwheat is killed by a ground frost. Mine was gone in October. Phacelia is supposed to be frost intolerant but I have had to spray it off every year, along with the linseed & volunteers from the previous crops. A sharp frost gives it a good kicking, but doesn't seem to finish the job.
 
Buckwheat is killed by a ground frost. Mine was gone in October. Phacelia is supposed to be frost intolerant but I have had to spray it off every year, along with the linseed & volunteers from the previous crops. A sharp frost gives it a good kicking, but doesn't seem to finish the job.
Got down to -7C and the Phacelia turned blue... However, much to my surprise, it is now nearly 2ft high in places in a B&B mix.... Now we have had some rain, it'll romp away. Wondering what to do next Spring already, will it shed enough seed to give a "crop" in 22/23 with just some suppemental seed DD in next Spring?
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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