Ploughing today

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Will 1594

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Arable Farmer
49 landed up Every one said they had had a good day and hope we do it again and could it be a two day jobby. Raised around £1100 for air ambulance. . The daisey bruwn man said the fluffy land took some ploughing. And he got his plot with the pole
 

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John 1594

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
Wish i had bought the TSR102 had i known how that land was!!!

Tbf, everyone was struggling, didnt help that the stubble had been mowed either

reckon my plough is duller now than when i arrived at 7 this morning :oops:
 

llamedos

New Member
Posting this on behalf of @ploughman61 somehow it seems to have eneded up as a Report, rather than a reply here.

ploughman61 Yesterday at 8:48 PM On behalf of the Judges thank you for wonderful day,judged some excellent ploughing, and the winner's were outstanding, hope that we got all the result's correct. Congregation's to Emma and all of her helper's on raising £1100 for the air ambulance, look forward to seeing you all again. Well done to Emma considering that was the fist match you organized it was brilliant, well done
 

arcobob

Member
Location
Norfolk
@arcobob you do know you came second In your class Emma has your rossette
Thanks Brian. I enjoyed the challenge and threw the match away by failing to set up the finish properly resulting in a disaster. Up to that point I was going quite well with a few little mistakes thrown in . Emma did a great job and I hope she has another go next year. I hope to see you at my match on February 19th.
 

Will 1594

Member
Arable Farmer
Thanks Brian. I enjoyed the challenge and threw the match away by failing to set up the finish properly resulting in a disaster. Up to that point I was going quite well with a few little mistakes thrown in . Emma did a great job and I hope she has another go next year. I hope to see you at my match on February 19th.
A few said the sand was quite a challenge . Poor old John could not get his plough to go as not shiny and was sticking , could of put him in some Flint but he did not want to shred his tyres and burn his points away . And you and mike had a good chat
 

John 1594

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
A few said the sand was quite a challenge . Poor old John could not get his plough to go as not shiny and was sticking , could of put him in some Flint but he did not want to shred his tyres and burn his points away . And you and mike had a good chat
Best bit of my day was the opening, after that it went downhill rapidly

Grandfather has come to the conclusion that i need TS90 skims and stalks in it, so i can twist the skims round more and give that bum fluff a chance to slide off them
 

arcobob

Member
Location
Norfolk
Best bit of my day was the opening, after that it went downhill rapidly

Grandfather has come to the conclusion that i need TS90 skims and stalks in it, so i can twist the skims round more and give that bum fluff a chance to slide off them
With match ploughing minimal skimming is the order of the day in order to produce more firmness. Skimmers should be set to create easy flow and therefore at an angle approaching that of the mouldboards. In most conditions I run mine forward of the share point by a couple of inches to avoid pinching a rising furrow slice, in other words I skim it before it moves. I use several patterns through the season to cope with chopped straw, strong wheat stubble or even maize stalks.
 

John 1594

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
With match ploughing minimal skimming is the order of the day in order to produce more firmness. Skimmers should be set to create easy flow and therefore at an angle approaching that of the mouldboards. In most conditions I run mine forward of the share point by a couple of inches to avoid pinching a rising furrow slice, in other words I skim it before it moves. I use several patterns through the season to cope with chopped straw, strong wheat stubble or even maize stalks.

I watched quite a few people dropping their skims in much deeper than normal, in an effort to get down past that horrible layer of fluff into something a bit more solid what would strike off the skims

it certainly didnt help that some of it had been topped, nor that the plough wasnt exactly bright. We had it working well on our land a few days before

It seems ive got everything in line with regards to the boards and the frame, it just needs a few acres of our nice stiff clay to put a shine on it.

far easier than spending a whole day with a grinder and a box of discs and ending up covered in dust and black as a coal man
 

arcobob

Member
Location
Norfolk
I watched quite a few people dropping their skims in much deeper than normal, in an effort to get down past that horrible layer of fluff into something a bit more solid what would strike off the skims

it certainly didnt help that some of it had been topped, nor that the plough wasnt exactly bright. We had it working well on our land a few days before

It seems ive got everything in line with regards to the boards and the frame, it just needs a few acres of our nice stiff clay to put a shine on it.

far easier than spending a whole day with a grinder and a box of discs and ending up covered in dust and black as a coal man
Not to mention the miserable wife and the knackered washing machine:rolleyes::rolleyes:
 

Roy Stokes

Member
Location
East Shropshire
A few said the sand was quite a challenge .
I watched quite a few people dropping their skims in much deeper than normal, in an effort to get down past that horrible layer of fluff into something a bit more solid what would strike off the skims

it certainly didnt help that some of it had been topped, nor that the plough wasnt exactly bright. We had it working well on our land a few days before

It seems ive got everything in line with regards to the boards and the frame, it just needs a few acres of our nice stiff clay to put a shine on it.

far easier than spending a whole day with a grinder and a box of discs and ending up covered in dust and black as a coal man
Many ploughmen refer to sand as "Boy's Land" however in my experience ploughmen from heavy land struggle with soft bad scouring land having been used to soil that will shift due to having plenty of weight in it, .
By contrast ploughmen who are brought up on sand, given they have an equal ability can take to clay without troubling themselves.

Getting the soil to flow over the skims and mouldboards is an art in itself which saves wearing metal, reduces fuel consumption and increases efficiency, the costings used for showing how inefficient ploughing to establish crops is take no account of having a top operator on the seat, in the days of horse ploughing the importance of plough setting was even higher as poor setting would tire the horses much earlier in the day.
25 years ago I was using 130 HP to shift 90 inches of soil and press it with a 96 inch furrow press at an average of 4.5/5mph, these days most seem to need 180 HP to achieve the same result, progress ?
 

John 1594

Member
Location
Cambridgeshire
Many ploughmen refer to sand as "Boy's Land" however in my experience ploughmen from heavy land struggle with soft bad scouring land having been used to soil that will shift due to having plenty of weight in it, .
By contrast ploughmen who are brought up on sand, given they have an equal ability can take to clay without troubling themselves.

Getting the soil to flow over the skims and mouldboards is an art in itself which saves wearing metal, reduces fuel consumption and increases efficiency, the costings used for showing how inefficient ploughing to establish crops is take no account of having a top operator on the seat, in the days of horse ploughing the importance of plough setting was even higher as poor setting would tire the horses much earlier in the day.
25 years ago I was using 130 HP to shift 90 inches of soil and press it with a 96 inch furrow press at an average of 4.5/5mph, these days most seem to need 180 HP to achieve the same result, progress ?

Compaction

25 years ago we didnt have 9 row self propelled beet harvesters and 30ft wide combines holding 12 tons per tank trundling across the land

vicious circle.

2 years ago i let someone else combine 2 of our fields as i was occupied elsewhere on a job what was particulary urgent. They had a 30ft cut NH CX8090

Not only was i 2 gears slower than usual when i ploughed them, you could still see the wheelings in last years crop, and can faintly see them even now its ploughed again. It will need another year to get over it

contrast to my 6 ton combine what hardly makes a footprint wherever it goes
 

Roy Stokes

Member
Location
East Shropshire
Too deep, too shallow, too wide, too narrow, or just completely in the wrong place :scratchhead:
View attachment 463512
You have no problem driving straight John,
opening with a 4 furrow was never going to be easy, I used to carve out a single back furrow with my 5 furrow conventional, then on the way back across the field I would run the disc side of the front share up the disc cut from the first run and carve out a single furrow in the opposite direction, the plough would be tilted up to the right ( as viewed from the rear ) and tilted back slightly on the top link, the 2nd furrow would deepen the middle of the opening just as it would do if opening with a 2 furrow, the 3rd furrow would turn in the 1st run of the opening plus fresh soil from underneath the 1st run at 2/3rds to 3/4 depth to make the 1st furrow of the crown with the 4th and 5th furrow making the 2nd and 3rd furrows of the crown getting deeper to full depth, with the plough still tilted up but not quite as much the plough was then pulled back across the field turning in the front furrow of the 2nd run of the opening to make the ridge with the rest of the furrows getting progressively deeper until the rear furrow was at full depth.
In my opinion this is the best option for any multi furrow conventional plough to start a plot in an arable situation
 
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