River Lugg, Herefordshire

onthehoof

Member
Location
Cambs
May be of interest, Copy of survey Dec 2013 for Great Ouse and 100ft river
Allegedly carried out regularly. Note reference in Site Summary
"
Riverbed Conditions
The riverbed is assumed to be composed of mud, soft silt, sand and
gravel.
H6787 "
Im not sure how one is supposed to interpret those results or whether they really need to survey the riverbed every 3 months, how the hell much does that cost!!, I have a better graph showing bed levels over time if I can find it
 
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onthehoof

Member
Location
Cambs
The graph below shows river bed levels in the Tidal Ouse river from Denver to the Wash, this is the biggest worry, as you can see although there are fluctuations, the level of the river bed has risen about 3m (10ft) in about 70 years.
This river drains about 8600 sq km so any rise in bed levels here has a big effect on the catchment’s ability to discharge into the sea. Add to this possible climate change, rise in sea levels and lowering of the land you can see the problems around the corner.
923FF93B-D2E7-4EC5-80BA-E705C05644B2.jpeg
 

onthehoof

Member
Location
Cambs
Just wondered if changed the description what's in the river to cover them selves for the clay dug out.
For clarity this is the silt that builds up and needs removing, it’s basically sand that comes in from the Wash on the tide, virtually no silt comes from upstream


55BA183E-5021-41FE-BB02-7F81A5B3B92E.png


55B3AA3F-1D13-4FBA-9E44-2039399F1E14.png



This is what they dug out, there is no clay in the wash, the only way it could have got there is if it was put there when the river was made or it is the natural geology of the area, as the river was built on top of 20ft of peat this is unlikely, either way it shouldn’t have been removed

EF57EF18-E2A2-4F40-A9D5-0A9D1A8494A1.png
 
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anzani

Member
For clarity this is the silt that builds up and needs removing, it’s basically sand that comes in from the Wash on the tide, virtually no silt comes from upstream


View attachment 1038318

View attachment 1038328


This is what they dug out, there is no clay in the wash, the only way it could have got there is if it was put there when the river was made or it is the natural geology of the area, as the river was built on top of 20ft of peat this is unlikely, either way it shouldn’t have been removed

View attachment 1038329
You may find this of interest. Troubled waters indeed
 

mobileweld

Member
Arable Farmer
There is a really good book written by a chap called Alan Bloom (yes he founded Blooms Nurseries and Bressingham Gardens). The book is called “The Farm in the Fen” and was published in 1944.

I found a copy of this for sale on eBay after seeing your post here. It arrived today.

taking it on holiday in a couple months will read it on the plane! 👍🏻
 

Timbo1080

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
Somerset
Hmmmmmmmm, for interest - Link to The Angling Trust's "Riparian Habitat Destruction" paperwork....Cites The River Lugg, the EA's ineptitude on The River Blackwater, and also the most recent "Complete devastation, courtesy of the EA" of the River Tone near Creech Castle, Taunton......Flood alleviation works.

 

holwellcourtfarm

Member
NFFN Member
I'll just park this here as it seems appropriate...

"One of the actions we're taking is to work with the EA to build a Rural Resilience Partnership to help improve flood resilience in rural areas."

 

Hjcarter

Member
You can't seriously tell me that 14 people were needed to respond to this terrible heinous crime?

Any news on the soil sample yet?
Don't know who the local mp is but they should be asking some pretty difficult questions to plod and DEFRA.

It was excessive in every respect - in process, resource usage and cost. These people are supposedly public servants and I won't believe that the levels of resources and cost were justified - you'd get less people on a drugs raid!

The management of both police and DEFRA should be publicly held to account.
 

quattro

Member
Location
scotland
Don't know who the local mp is but they should be asking some pretty difficult questions to plod and DEFRA.

It was excessive in every respect - in process, resource usage and cost. These people are supposedly public servants and I won't believe that the levels of resources and cost were justified - you'd get less people on a drugs raid!

The management of both police and DEFRA should be publicly held to account.
Sadly over the top typical making a mountain out of a mole hill for sepa
be interesting if they did a survey of peoples response on a before and after
(of locals who could be flooded)
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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