Shed build

Case290

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Worcestershire
What happened to the shed building spec to need 254 rafters and 305 posts on a 40ft wide shed, seams excessive .
 

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fermerboy

Member
Location
Banffshire
What happened to the shed building spec to need 254 rafters and 305 posts on a 40ft wide shed, seams excessive .
What happened was that well over 3000 sheds fell down after 3foot of snow sat on the roof of them in N E Scotland about 10yrs ago mine included, a lot more metal is in portal frame sheds in these parts since then.
Depends on where you are, snow and wind loading calcs but thats what my last two have, and the wind we have tonight don't think I'd want less.
Its maybe the photo but the haunches seem short on that beams in the picture compared to mine.
 
A lot of original design didn’t have a lot of allowance for agricultural conditions. Steels strength is from its section and have never heard of corrosion allowances for portal frames. And having seen many an ag portal frame heavily corroded would say that any extra strength is a blessing, the saving grace is galvanising but not always opted for and some substances still attack it.
Appreciate steel is costly at moment but the additional cost of a heavier larger section is excellent value for money compared to a disaster 10,30 or 40 years down the line.
It is interesting to get quotes for same shed from multiple manufacturers and see the large variances in weights and sections proposed, all down to detail and engineers comfort factor.
You could get an engineer to get round using smaller sections but additional details added and engineers time would negate any savings I would suspect.
 

Case290

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Worcestershire
We have got some 40ft sheds with 7 inch rafters 8 inch posts probably 40yrs old don’t get it with the supper size steel now.
 

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dannewhouse

Member
Location
huddersfield
what do you use for moving these steel around and in/out of the workshop, I'm looking at kitting a workshop up for making steel buildings.

got a good set of rollers in and out of the saw,
forklift to shift them onto trestles to be welded but then how to shift them out lengthways?

last few have been made in an old shed, ended up backing trailer in then lowering onto it. obviously cant have a 30ft+ doorway for carrying 60+ ft spans out.

side loader forklift or overhead crane are looking like options?
 

Nearly

Member
Location
North of York
what do you use for moving these steel around and in/out of the workshop, I'm looking at kitting a workshop up for making steel buildings.

got a good set of rollers in and out of the saw,
forklift to shift them onto trestles to be welded but then how to shift them out lengthways?

last few have been made in an old shed, ended up backing trailer in then lowering onto it. obviously cant have a 30ft+ doorway for carrying 60+ ft spans out.

side loader forklift or overhead crane are looking like options?
4 wheel trolley with transit axle at one end and electric motor onto the diff?

Modern thinking is a linear shed, steel in at one and and shed pieces out of the other. cut, weld and paint as they go through.
 

hutchy143211

Member
Location
E. Yorkshire
As a structural engineer I can say that designing to Eurocode, location in the UK does impact the wind loading calculations. There is also adjustment based on direction to the prevailing wind direction which is accounted for separately as well. In all honesty by the time you have messed around will all of the adjustment factors it just isn't worth it for simple portal frame structures as the design costs will outweigh any steel saving. If anyone is interested its in the documentation its BS EN1991-1-4 and the UK National Annex (Adjustments to the basic Eurocode for the UK)
 

dannewhouse

Member
Location
huddersfield
4 wheel trolley with transit axle at one end and electric motor onto the diff?

Modern thinking is a linear shed, steel in at one and and shed pieces out of the other. cut, weld and paint as they go through.
linear shed yes,
how do you transport them still?

I had debated a trolley type system to wheel them around lengthways.
 

dannewhouse

Member
Location
huddersfield
I use a side loader, always have
Couldn’t imagine any other way.
Another good thing is
boom jib with welder
Greco Paint sprayer
Punch machine
Band saw
Gas cutter
Hammer & angle grinder
got the hammer and angle grinder, and the bigger one for extra adjustments!!!
punch machine, do they distort the end plates much? just rota broached end plates normally as its not that bad of a job, got to Rota broach the legs anyway.
gas cutter at the moment, debating a plasma.

auto feed bandsaw up to 600mm godsend! every cut lines up bang on

boom jib probably a good idea how long is yours as you never seam to be able to get to both ends in one go.
 

dannewhouse

Member
Location
huddersfield
problem with roller tables is once you've welded purlin cleats on they're useless.
only ok with gussets on if laid sideways.

debating some trolley type things with wheels, perhaps that can be locked and don't bother with any trestles.
 

sgoti

Member
got the hammer and angle grinder, and the bigger one for extra adjustments!!!
punch machine, do they distort the end plates much? just rota broached end plates normally as its not that bad of a job, got to Rota broach the legs anyway.
gas cutter at the moment, debating a plasma.

auto feed bandsaw up to 600mm godsend! every cut lines up bang on

boom jib probably a good idea how long is yours as you never seam to be able to get to both ends in one go.
yes they get bent like a banan if you havn't got a anti difflection stripper, i have one on my geka
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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