Stable block

4course

Member
Location
north yorks
most flatpack stables are cheap and cheerful ,last about a week before dobbin puts one or both back feet through them then need 3/4 ply boarding ,plus the gals dont like getting their hair wet whilst they attend to his needs , often they are made of ticky tack and with luck are servicible for about 5 years before needing a refurb if not sooner as good ole dobbin will have eaten the fecker ( they like softwood even if treated) then of course you could well be competing with the guy down the road doing it for pin money. best of luck
 
I worked on a place where virtually every farm building had been or was considered for installing internal stables in them.

Don't scrimp on the construction, at £25/week per nag (this was years ago now) you can soon rack up some cash. This will mean using decent kick boarding inside, decent doors and double latches and a metal/galv piece of channel over the top of doors or divisions to stop gnawing.

I would not use onduline roofing if it was me, cement boarding is a lot less grief.

Consideration must be given to manure storage- the horsery types will generate huge quantities of it in no time, you'll be surprised.

Reserve the right to remove any customer without any reason being given: troublemakers and non-payers can soon spoil the whole batch. You want slightly 'older' ladies who have sensible jobs- ask for their employers to give a character reference before agreeing to take up the arrangement by them. Insist on payment by standing order. Managed correctly it will be a self-policing thing because the more serious horsefolk won't tolerate anyone abusing 'their' yard.

Horsery folk seem to generate litter and waste- have a dedicated place for burning rubbish. Be very wary of allowing them to park lorries or horseboxes around the place.

Ideally each owner would have a dedicated lockable store for tack and feed or equipment to avoid arguments.

A cross country course of sorts can be built for not stupid money around the edges of fields and they don't interfere with normal farming. Topped a few times a year. Indoor or outdoor arenas attract more folk because they can play horses in bad weather no problem.

Work out how many stables you can fit in and go from there. The farm I worked on used simple timber internal stabling inside some traditional and more modern farm buildings. If possible keep farming areas separate from horse areas just for reasons of safety.
 

Ukjay

Member
Location
Wales!
I would definitely go American Style steel frame for your stables, and get the galv top stable cubicles that you can put solid screens in to separate the nags, as the fukers are very bipolar and kick sh!t out of the stables if they do not like the horse next to them. And mares in season - another pita completely 😂

I would also brick up the back wall to avoid having to constantly repair the kicked out ply / chipboard that normally gets installed there and put a window in the wall to improve ventilation further and allow the horses to look out as it reduces stress if they can look what is going on around.

We used to have wood stables and now American barn type and the difference is unbelievable. We just need to convert the back wall to block and add windows to make it more robust.

Here is ours following a major overhaul from the previous owners neglected state.
Still got the block work to get sorted as said.

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robs1

Member
Block work is ok but have had them kicked off the damp proof course by one kicking at a horse next door it didnt like, dontvuse ply, if they kick through that then pull their legs back they would end up bring shot due to injuries, it needs to be minimum of 18mm if you use it, we have gone to using concrete panels now, quick and easy to put up and take down if you change the use, as has been said they need a lot of space for feed,tack and all the other stuff they have, also it is a good idea to have maximum of 6 or do in each block, horses are fine owners argue.
You can make decent money but as has been said your wife may well end up losing her friends when they keep horses together send it happen many times,
 

Ukjay

Member
Location
Wales!
Block work is ok but have had them kicked off the damp proof course by one kicking at a horse next door it didnt like, dontvuse ply, if they kick through that then pull their legs back they would end up bring shot due to injuries, it needs to be minimum of 18mm if you use it, we have gone to using concrete panels now, quick and easy to put up and take down if you change the use, as has been said they need a lot of space for feed,tack and all the other stuff they have, also it is a good idea to have maximum of 6 or do in each block, horses are fine owners argue.
You can make decent money but as has been said your wife may well end up losing her friends when they keep horses together send it happen many times,
I forgot the part of having a horse with anxiety issues - gees they are fun..

More horses in the stables for company - but no, they still want to buck / rear / whiney as loud as they can and kick the sh!t out of the stables...

Oh, and lighting is a topic on its own - need good lighting to avoid spooking the horses due to shadows.

Did you get windows in the concrete panels - or did you simply have none?
 
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Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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