Which breed of stock bull?

FarmerDanny1989

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Scotland
Both breeders that they came from have given up the breed,as for blood lines I can't remember all the stock bulls were very quiet and easy to handle it was just the young stock were the problem and that was on Simmentals! The only thing I did notice was the redder the bull the easier fleshing the calves were
Most people Iv spoke to about blondes go on about there docility. Guess I can only find out for myself. That’s good to know thanks.
 
Stabiliser Bull here on BB x Lim x dairy cows. Everything finished, so not looking for anything shapey for stores. Calves born extremely easily at 35 to 38Kg's and up suckling earlier and without help over our AI sired LIM calves in general. Finish at mostly R4Ls Bullocks and Females at 350Kg DW. Will get up to 650/700Kg Liveweight if required as bull is 920Kg on 650Kg cows. Been very pleased with the move, know they're not to everyones taste.
 

Cowslip

Member
Mixed Farmer
How do you find the SD? Do you know if they finish well? I sell roughly 50% of mine live @ 10/11 months rest I finish 16-20 months.
How do you find the SD? Do you know if they finish well? I sell roughly 50% of mine live @ 10/11 months rest I finish 16-20 months.
Extremely quiet, milky cows , cows have good longevity and make good cull prices, have fattened before no problem at all, heifers get fat on grass alone. The pure steers don't make as much as the lim x and saler x when sold as stores but that is to be expected. I had a heifer have a c section( not her fault calf was backward and twisted)
I removed the stitches from her today in the yard on my own, no crush or handling needed.
 

tr250

Member
Location
Northants
How do you find your salers? Wouldn’t mind trying them Iv heard there very good mothers but can be wild?
Our our generally fairly quiet good mothers get in calf well etc. The downsides are some can be protective of the calves at calving but they are more predictable than a protective lim with flightyness aswell. The other thing is they are a bit lean to finnish. But on heifers they are great
 

Bullring

Member
Location
Cornwall
Extremely quiet, milky cows , cows have good longevity and make good cull prices, have fattened before no problem at all, heifers get fat on grass alone. The pure steers don't make as much as the lim x and saler x when sold as stores but that is to be expected. I had a heifer have a c section( not her fault calf was backward and twisted)
I removed the stitches from her today in the yard on my own, no crush or handling needed.
I find the opposite now, my SD steers are sold as stores around 18 months and make more than the Lims in market, SD’s weigh heavy, I have repeat buyers and they all say how they are switching to more native breeds due to docility and they take less feed to finish. Probably due to location as this part of the world is where Sd’s are commonly found.
 

Cowslip

Member
Mixed Farmer
I find the opposite now, my SD steers are sold as stores around 18 months and make more than the Lims in market, SD’s weigh heavy, I have repeat buyers and they all say how they are switching to more native breeds due to docility and they take less feed to finish. Probably due to location as this part of the world is where Sd’s are commonly found.
We tend to sell ours around the 12 month age, we are not in a prominent sd area. Did you go to the sale on Wednesday?
 

egbert

Member
I find the opposite now, my SD steers are sold as stores around 18 months and make more than the Lims in market, SD’s weigh heavy, I have repeat buyers and they all say how they are switching to more native breeds due to docility and they take less feed to finish. Probably due to location as this part of the world is where Sd’s are commonly found.
We tend to sell ours around the 12 month age, we are not in a prominent sd area. Did you go to the sale on Wednesday?
Deffo a vote for SDs here on anything other than extreme hill regimes.

There is a better market for them in their home turf it's true, but they grow into big beasts very easily...which isn't a bad commercial trait wherever you are.

Best kept secret in UK beef i reckon.
 

Wolds Beef

Member
@Cowslip Whose breeding is that? Is it polled? Did Douglas Scott have any animals there?
@FarmerDanny1989 Melton Multibreed starts at 8.30am with show and 11.30 with the sale. Several breeds there for you to choose from and can be watched on Auctionmarts.com
Enjoy and look closely at the Lincoln Red's!!
WB
 

Cowslip

Member
Mixed Farmer
@Cowslip Whose breeding is that? Is it polled? Did Douglas Scott have any animals there?
@FarmerDanny1989 Melton Multibreed starts at 8.30am with show and 11.30 with the sale. Several breeds there for you to choose from and can be watched on Auctionmarts.com
Enjoy and look closely at the Lincoln Red's!!
WB
He's a waddeton bull, homozygous polled.
Douglas didn't have any in the sale his stockman was there though.
 

nelly55

Member
Location
Yorkshire
I had a lovely limmi full ped brought out of a market at 9 months old £600 ,lost him last year aged 12,had a blonde but couldn’t get weighs on finished cattle.Always had simmi breed my own ,temperament is everything.Current one is throwing great calves,sadly killed his pen mate as told by bull buyers not good enough.Well they are reared in the fat pens so no special treatment ,15 months old 498kg dead E4 clearly he was good enough.
 

Grace

Member
Livestock Farmer
Does anyone have an experience with the Sussex breed? I quite like the look of them but unsure as never really came across them before.
I have recently started a job with the Sussex breed and they are so quiet! So far they have been the easiest and quietest cows that I've ever calved! (Angus, simmentals and commercials), they have struggled to get the purebred finished before 2 years old but other breeders that push them a little bit more and getting quicker finished cattle.
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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