Bamford corn mill

jacobl741

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Buxton
Anyone on here know what speed the shaft on a bamford roller mill similar to the one in the pic Should run at? And what sort of hp it would need? Cheers !

1642537796745.jpeg
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
That is a good question, from memory it was not that fast. i would have thought it was in the order of 2-3 revs per second or 1-200 per minute.
Be careful putting too much power in, the chassis is not that strong. They need a constant feed so the rollers are not touching, but not too much to strain the machine.
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
Ours used to run off an electric motor I am sure it was no more than 5hp and could have been a lot less
Was 60 years ago so memory is not that great.
Ours cracked the frame and we bought an Alvan Blanch mill mixer
 

rick_vandal

Member
Location
Soft South
I think you have a plate mill, not a roller mill. We had a Bentall XRSE roller mill with ornate castings that died of fatigue. It replaced a dirty MH hammer mill and was superceded by a yellow Bamford bruiser unit.
 

jf850

Member
Location
Co laois
Anyone on here know what speed the shaft on a bamford roller mill similar to the one in the pic Should run at? And what sort of hp it would need? Cheers !

View attachment 1010860

There is a similar crusher here . Bamford 4C is on it . Hasn't worked since the 1980s , when I bought a Fraser 7 " roller .
The pulley on ours was on the end of the shaft , on the outside of the flywheel . Originally it was driven by the belt pulley on a Fordson E27N TVO . In latter years it was driven by pto belt pulley on a Fordson Dexta . Belt pulley speed was not measured in rpm but in feet per min .
 

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Five nature-recovery projects spanning 100,000ha launched

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Written by Michelle Martin from Agriland

Image-source-Savills-field-640x360.jpg
Five nature-recovery projects spanning nearly 100,000ha across the West Midlands, Cambridgeshire, the Peak District, Norfolk and Somerset have been announced by the government and Natural England today (Thursday, May 26).

This is the equivalent in size to all 219 current National Reserves.

The aim of the projects is to deliver nature recovery at a landscape scale, helping to tackle biodiversity loss, climate change and improve public health and well-being.

All five projects will make a significant contribution towards the national delivery of the international commitment to protect at least 30% of land and...
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