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Claas Senator - freeing up a blockage

Discussion in 'Classic Machinery' started by New Puritan, Sep 10, 2018.

  1. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    I had betterr post this on the cycling forums, to expect major hold ups on this route, ps dont forget to fold your header. :):):)
     
  2. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    I have cut rye several times, very long straw and heavy grain. Get it fit and it thrashes very easily, but I expect it is badly laid and sometimes will only cut one way, if the heads are in the drum before the knife has got to the end of the straw.
    I wonder if the stripping rotor has a blockage if the drive has still not started, even walker blockage, may indicate a serious breakdown somewhere
     
  3. New Puritan

    New Puritan Member

    Location:
    East Sussex
    Groan.

    In words a simpleton can understand, what's the stripping rotor? I can imagine what it does, but whereabouts is it, and roughly what does it look like? The walkers don't seem to be blocked, I've had a good look around there.

    Happily the crop is not laid at all yet, though if I don't get this sorted soon I'm sure it will be...
     
  4. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    The stripping rotor is the secondary drum behind the main one which strips the straw off and chucks it on to the walkers.
    I am not overly conversant with Claas machines but I think the internals on all earlier machines are very similar.
    Some of these secondary drum did have some form of concave not sure on your machine
     
    New Puritan likes this.
  5. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    We once cut some grazing rye for seed and seem to remember that it was about 4 metres high. Even grain rye can reach 2 without straw shortenerd
     
    New Puritan likes this.
  6. New Puritan

    New Puritan Member

    Location:
    East Sussex
    Thanks @Exfarmer - that's helpful. I will investigate more tomorrow morning and see what's happening, though I have a tyre to change over first just to add to the fun. The rye I am growing is probably not much over a meter tall, so nothing like the stuff you were growing, which sounds challenging (though possibly less challenging than growing the variety I am, with such a ropey old combine to cut it).
     
  7. David.

    David. Member

    Location:
    J11 M40
    To the extent that it would smash your lunchbox if you had chosen to stow it under the drum lever.:rolleyes:
     
  8. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    The flask and lunchbox would never be put in such danger.
     
  9. Selectamatic

    Selectamatic Member

    Location:
    North Wales
    Bloody cyclists.

    Bike technology have come a long way recently.

    You know your going steady on your trusty old DB when some lycra clad hero cycles past you, and gradually pulls away.

    Then come hills. DB's win on hills! :)
     
    New Puritan likes this.
  10. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    Dream on :)
     
    Selectamatic likes this.
  11. Mursal

    Mursal Member

    Passing on the inside, and it wasn't a dream ..............
     
  12. jamesy

    jamesy Member

    Location:
    Orkney
    Once drum is turning freely via bar through casting take a gander round, if the walkers aren’t going fast enough that can cause the drum to block up for no obvious reason.... could be a slack/knackered belt for the walkers
     
    New Puritan likes this.
  13. bobk

    bobk Member

    Location:
    stafford
    Doesn't take much to block a Senator , old chap managed it 3x a day . :banghead::banghead::banghead:
     
    New Puritan likes this.
  14. Gormers

    Gormers Member

    Location:
    east yorkshire
    Look on the bright side, at least he wasn’t on a MF520/525 :rolleyes::)
     
  15. yellowbelly

    yellowbelly Member

    Location:
    N.Lincs
    MF525:eek::eek: - that Multi-Flow separator was a pain :facepalm:
     
    rob h, Gormers, fredf and 1 other person like this.
  16. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    If you thought they were bad, you should have driven a 515 the multi flow was a lot lower, and with their lovely gear shift , now where is that ******** reverse :(:(;)
     
  17. bobk

    bobk Member

    Location:
    stafford
    The worst was the 625 .... hideous , unreliable pile of :poop: @Cowabunga
     
  18. towbar

    towbar Member

    Location:
    Louth, Ireland
  19. Exfarmer

    Exfarmer Member

    Location:
    Bury St Edmunds
    I was very shy of going from MF combines to a JD. We had the MF dealer 2 miles away, the JD 20 miles, they also had perhaps not the best reputation with the sales manager , shall we say difficult.
    Eventually the JD dealer made an offer we could not refuse, I could not believe after the first season how little we required a mechanic
     
  20. David.

    David. Member

    Location:
    J11 M40
    My wife's father had a 625, I always thought it a really good machine, never a green stripe and easy 20ac days.
    However, we were using an 8'6" 400 at the time, which truly was crap.
     

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