Greening effects of strobes in cereals

Farmer Fin

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Aberdeenshire
It seems to be accepted that strobes prolong greening of a crop. Are there any difference between strobes and is the effect still seen so much with their loss of activity? There appear to be a few papers but I can’t access them as I don’t have a subscription.
 
It seems to be accepted that strobes prolong greening of a crop. Are there any difference between strobes and is the effect still seen so much with their loss of activity? There appear to be a few papers but I can’t access them as I don’t have a subscription.

Greening effect of these fungicides is still noticeable, it is sort of separate to their disease activity. Other fungicides also have interesting physiological effects on crop plants. Some of the SDHI products used to demonstrate interesting effects on root growth. Of course, the strobilurins still show useful activity on diseases other than septoria which may be of interest to farmers in areas where septoria isn't the only threat.
 

Farmer Fin

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Aberdeenshire
Greening effect of these fungicides is still noticeable, it is sort of separate to their disease activity. Other fungicides also have interesting physiological effects on crop plants. Some of the SDHI products used to demonstrate interesting effects on root growth. Of course, the strobilurins still show useful activity on diseases other than septoria which may be of interest to farmers in areas where septoria isn't the only threat.
As I understand it strobes have an effect of chlorophyll production. Most seems to stem back to one research paper. Just wondering if there was any more evidence?
 
As I understand it strobes have an effect of chlorophyll production. Most seems to stem back to one research paper. Just wondering if there was any more evidence?

The evidence will no doubt exist, only it will be proprietary and no one will release/publish it. In the ag-chem world the big companies patent and protect absolutely everything and anything, even if it has no immediate commercial value. Create a new material- immediately patent it even if they have no intention of bringing it to market.
 

Flat 10

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Fen Edge
I believe comet(?) has greening on the label and as such had to have some evidence somewhere that it worked? Anecdotally I think they probably do but whether this translates to extra yield I’m not sure. There are far more knowledgeable people than me on here…..
 

Gong Farmer

Member
BASIS
Location
Glos
I always believed the extended greening effect but assumed it was simply down to disease control, removing the stresses of infection such that senescence is delayed. It was marked with strobes as they were by far superior fungicides when they first came out, and even today control some disease hence can still prolong GLA.
 

Flatlander

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lorette Manitoba
Used on oats here at flag leaf the whole plant was as green as grass except for the head. Grain was 12% moisture and the straw would have made silage. Can’t use roundup on milling oats so had to swath and wait a week for them to dry down.
 

alomy75

Member
I believe comet(?) has greening on the label and as such had to have some evidence somewhere that it worked? Anecdotally I think they probably do but whether this translates to extra yield I’m not sure. There are far more knowledgeable people than me on here…..
100% correct. To have any claim on a pesticide label there has to be a whole raft of work done, replicated and then re-done over multiple years and multiple sites
 
The trick is that many many pesticides are taken up by crop pants and disrupt their metabolism as they have to be worked out of the system. This alone may be why anecdotally people see less lodging or stronger straw when using fungicides, or delayed senescence or increased root growth, etc. Some kind of physiological stress is placed on the plant and it responds in such a way to try and counter act it.
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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