How late with roundup to stop wild oat seed

czechmate

Member
Mixed Farmer
So, after a catastrophic winter barley crop (I suppose because of it) I now have an unbelievable block of wild oats :(.
I hadn’t even seen one here before:scratchhead:
Some barley is below 30%, some isn’t, of course being such a poor crop it is very variable.
Wild oats are watery to milky. How long have I got to prevent them becoming viable please?
Break crop next year was going to be...
Oats :ROFLMAO:
I can change that plan to beans :)
 

czechmate

Member
Mixed Farmer
This has been such a puzzle to me - where they came from. Just discussing with the wife, and suddenly remembered the last job the year before was helping next door finish harvest and this patch was the beginning of last year harvest:banghead:
 

czechmate

Member
Mixed Farmer
How far behind the barley are they ? if they're a fair bit behind roundup is the only answer .
You can tell the cattle before you feed it .
Barley 30%
wild oats watery/milky. I am sure the barley will be on the floor by the time the WO will go through the combine.
My question was how mature can I allow the WO to get? Just trying to get the most out of the very poor barley :(
 

bobk

Member
Location
stafford
Barley 30%
wild oats watery/milky. I am sure the barley will be on the floor by the time the WO will go through the combine.
My question was how mature can I allow the WO to get? Just trying to get the most out of the very poor barley :(
I'd be more concerned having a bigger area of the fudgein things next year .
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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