I thought I'd seen it all, hay making Montana style.

Agrivator

Member
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fgc325j

Member
As the bloke in the commentary stated "they don't get much rain here". From what i can gather, the temperature in the summer is usually around
the 30C mark, if we had that here, in the uk, how much silage would be made. Also, if you watch "Qur Wyoming Life", Mike said that during the previous drought summer he round baled, from 90 acres - the total of 6 bales. And this was with a standard,belt round baler. Different farming
altogether.
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
I seem to remember kit similar to the first video being used here in the UK but smaller scale and powered by horses, but I was very young at the time. Occasionally see the rakes (obviously smaller so they fit through gates!) advertised as ornaments, but with the shafts cut off and a tow bar for tractor use. Just because it's old technology doesn't mean it won't work.

I've seen cocked hay made in the West of Ireland and that's a way to make excellent hay in a wet climate.
 

yellowbelly

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
N.Lincs
I seem to remember kit similar to the first video being used here in the UK but smaller scale and powered by horses, but I was very young at the time.
Farms down on the Trentside in this part of the world used a thing called a Derrick Crane (IIRC) to unload a wagon of hay in one go.
It was like a giant wooden buckrake swung off a thing that was like a ship's derrick. Picked the whole load up and swung to round onto the stack.

I remember the old blokes saying, that if they got it wrong, they sometimes picked up the waggon and horses as well :eek:
 

Danllan

Member
Location
Sir Gar / Carms
A friend of mine has a daughter that lives out there and claims that if they have a wild fire they just let all the stock and horses out to fend for themselves, then after it has past they spend a few days with the neighbours sorting out whatever is left.
Yep, heard that happened in Zim a couple of times when I was out there, never saw it though since it was in a different province; in my initial ignorance it seemed a bit ill thought through to me at the time.

But,that written... if the wind is in the 'wrong' direction, the speed of a bush fire and the distance it can 'jump' is hard to appreciate until you've witnessed it - as I subsequently have a few times. :(
 

DanM

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Wiltshire
I seem to remember kit similar to the first video being used here in the UK but smaller scale and powered by horses, but I was very young at the time. Occasionally see the rakes (obviously smaller so they fit through gates!) advertised as ornaments, but with the shafts cut off and a tow bar for tractor use. Just because it's old technology doesn't mean it won't work.

I've seen cocked hay made in the West of Ireland and that's a way to make excellent hay in a wet climate.

Could you please educate us youngsters, as to what “cocked hay” is?
 
I seem to remember kit similar to the first video being used here in the UK but smaller scale and powered by horses, but I was very young at the time. Occasionally see the rakes (obviously smaller so they fit through gates!) advertised as ornaments, but with the shafts cut off and a tow bar for tractor use. Just because it's old technology doesn't mean it won't work.

I've seen cocked hay made in the West of Ireland and that's a way to make excellent hay in a wet climate.
Yep, and stooks of Oats, around 1980 I guess.
 

CHAP Webinar - Innovative tools to overcome the challenges of Regen Ag

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Applying principles of regen ag can incur a range of on-farm challenges. Learn how innovative tools & machinery can help with these hurdles.

This event will be held online from 1pm to 2pm on Thursday 2nd December 2021 so please block it out in your diary.

About this event​

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