Replacing an oak tree

jellybean

Member
Location
N.Devon
We lost this tree in a storm 2 years ago and the deer really miss the shade in this current weather. they do have shade at the bottom of the field but there is no breeze there and they also like to be able to see what is going on around them.

IMG_1960.jpg





IMG_1961.jpg




IMG_1962.jpg


I want to plant 4 or 5 individual oaks across the slope but they will obviously take a long time to provide any shade. The most cost effective deer fence for tree protection using standard materials would be a square with each side 14 feet.
Italian alders do well on this ground and grow fast. Could I put one in each corner of the 14 ft square to act as nurse trees with an oak in the middle and if necessary take out the alders at a later date.
Or any other suggestions gratefully received.
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
What nice photo that makes, perfect pastoral scene imo.

anyway, Hornbeam makes a nice specimen or belt for shade or windbreak.

Chestnut makes good shade but prefers better soil.

of course for best chance Water well in first few yrs and makes a a heck of a difference to growth speed.
Both them grow fairly fast but I'm afraid as you know its not going to be a quick fix, which is young people are best placed to plant trees if they want ti see any benifit guess, otherwise its like the boss said to me ' you plant trees for other people'
 

jellybean

Member
Location
N.Devon
Cyril Hart, my forestry lecturer of 50 years ago, advised planting a dozen or more oaks to replace a single one for the very good reason that they may not all make it! If you just plant one, the odds against survival are considerably reduced.
Good point, problem is the cost of fencing them. A group of oaks would be cheaper than individuals so I may be better to do 2 or 3 groups rather than 5 or 6 individuals.
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
Quite a few years back I went to a tree grower to buy a few lime trees . His saying was as above "you'll be planting these for your grandson then ? " My reply, " well somebody has to plant something sometime !" They're quite substantial trees now !

When ever one of my friends (or anyone, come to that) moves to a new house, I tell them to plant trees. At worst, a few minutes with a chain saw can solve the problem if that's what they become. Outside my house is a small copse of larch trees, some nearly 18 inches in diameter. It has been thinned a couple of times delivering a lot of wood for the fire, some poles for a field shelter, wildlife, and comfort. Cost? £30 from the local mart and a few hours with a spade....oh, and 30 years of enjoyment!
 

Bury the Trash

Member
Mixed Farmer
It's a good time to reflect that over the last couple of hundred years 'other people' were kind enough to plant trees for us to enjoy. If ever there was a case of 'paying it forward' then this is it.
Yes indeed. The 'Boss' whom i refer to was/is a multi millionaire , a man who has planted an awful lot of deciduous in his latter years ,on his estate, he's a man whom i have huge respect for.
 

jellybean

Member
Location
N.Devon
See there's 1 in prison. What did it do wrong? ;)
The "prison" is a calf refuge and combined creep feeder. New born calves lie where they are left and on a hot day this can mean they are out in the full sun while mum goes off and sits in the shade so the "prison" lets them get away from any stroppy hinds, gives them shade and starter pellets if they feel like it. A smaller version of Sid's suggestion.
 

Montexy

Member
I planted a small copse area about 30 x 30 yards about 25 years ago, used Oak, Field Maple, Holly, and Ash, the Oaks have grown very tall- must be 35` but slender as they were too squashed in and were all competing for the light then two years ago all of the ash got dieback and I have taken them out now the Oaks are looking good, have more space, started branching out - give it another year or two and I will thin out the Maple to give the Oaks more space. Someone mentioned Hornbeam earlier and I planted one of those in a field at the same time and it is one of the best shade trees on the I planted. Most of the trees went in as 5 or 6` high whips. keep them watered in the first summer - bit of a chore but worth it in the end.
 

Roy_H

Member
Quite a few years back I went to a tree grower to buy a few lime trees . His saying was as above "you'll be planting these for your grandson then ? " My reply, " well somebody has to plant something sometime !" They're quite substantial trees now !
Limes grow like b***** hell! When we moved into our bungalow we were almost surrounded by them, they had been planted too close to the house, they cut out a lot of light reaching the house but the more l cut them back the more they grew back again and then some!:Not only that the roots were quaking up the driveway and pavement outside. Consequently ( With the council's permission) we had them out.
 

CHAP Webinar - Innovative tools to overcome the challenges of Regen Ag

  • 335
  • 1
https%3A%2F%2Fcdn.evbuc.com%2Fimages%2F186160299%2F486662465563%2F1%2Foriginal.20211115-160823


Applying principles of regen ag can incur a range of on-farm challenges. Learn how innovative tools & machinery can help with these hurdles.

This event will be held online from 1pm to 2pm on Thursday 2nd December 2021 so please block it out in your diary.

About this event​

Intro
This...
Top