Running a 7.5 tonne truck

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
When we start picking our veg later in the summer I’m going to have to do 60 mile round trips to deliver it. My original plan was to use the pickup and trailer, but now wondering if a 7.5 tonne flatbed or curtain slider would be more efficient in time. Anybody know the score on running costs and need for cpc for delivering our own produce? I’m old enough to have a class c1 on my licence and get the feeling there could be some inexpensive trucks around later in the year.
 

Tractortech

Member
Location
Cumbria
Now Then..
Inexpensive 7.5 tonnes are available all the time. If it's light enough it should carry almost 4000 Kg so, more than a pickup and trailer.
However, you'll need driver CPC, operators licence, maintenance checks etc
 

Dave W

Member
Location
chesterfield
I've thought about going down a similar route but I've decided to go with a flat bed iveco 3.5t pick up towing a trailer.
The payload of a 7.5t won't be dissimilar to that of pickup and trailer
 

bovrill

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East Essexshire
Someone else will know the legalities better, but I know of someone who runs a 7.5 tonner with a 3.5t trailer behind, giving an 11 ton gross weight driven with a car driving license.
 

bovrill

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East Essexshire
With a car licence you can only tow 750Kg on a 7.5 tonner. I have C+E (old style Class 1) so can pull up to the train weight
Blimey, the details of that look complicated!
Apparently, even though we've got old licenses with C1+E, we'd need to take a course and test to tow over the 750kg, but still classed as C1+E! At which point you can tow 4.5 tons!
I'm sure that O licences, insurance and vehicle ratings get complicated too, but interesting that with the right set up you could probably carry 8 tons of load without going full HGV.
 

JP1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Blimey, the details of that look complicated!
Apparently, even though we've got old licenses with C1+E, we'd need to take a course and test to tow over the 750kg, but still classed as C1+E! At which point you can tow 4.5 tons!
I'm sure that O licences, insurance and vehicle ratings get complicated too, but interesting that with the right set up you could probably carry 8 tons of load without going full HGV.
From memory it's something like 825kg tow behind a 7,5 tonner otherwise the vehicle train weight must be OK , the licence holder must have an LGV and the driver must do a driver CPC and renew every 5 years for commercial activities
 

sahara

Member
Location
Somerset
Our local builders merchant uses a Cabstar/Grafter type mini lorry for deliveries, this particular one has twin rear wheels each side, to maximize payload I suppose, would one of those be any good?
 

H200GT

Member
Location
NORTH WALES
Our local builders merchant uses a Cabstar/Grafter type mini lorry for deliveries, this particular one has twin rear wheels each side, to maximize payload I suppose, would one of those be any good?

I Know the Nissan Cabstar type trucks are limited to 3.5t, singe and twin wheel models, which makes the twin wheel rather pointless as it just reduces payload.

There are some trucks of the same build as the 7.5t trucks on the small wheels, that are plated to 12t, some of these can carry over 8t in tipper form. Handy trucks, better option than the 7.5t models in my opinion
 
I know someone who runs 3.5 ton flat bed trucks for building supplies. The make escapes me now, but they have a brilliant capacity. The advantage is, all his sons have been able to drive them from 17 onwards on normal licences. I'll try and find the make out.
 

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
Make sure 7.5 ton trucks with decent payloads are actually available. When we looked they were either expensive, hard to find or rubbish payload. My Cabstar and Ifor certainly carried a lot more.
We ended up running a 13ton curtainsider, never had any issues with staying the right side of the rules but CPC is feckin ridiculous.
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
Payload is a good point. The problem for us with something like a cab star is the narrow payload area, as all our veg needs to be palletised. Don’t think something like a transit or sprinter will be any better than pickup and trailer.
Its the cpc element of running a 7.5 tonne which looks like being the biggest PIA, yet if I was to hire one it doesn’t seem that I’d need one? (Not that I would as it would be too expensive). How is the cpc administered?
 

Timbo

Member
Location
Gods County
Someone else will know the legalities better, but I know of someone who runs a 7.5 tonner with a 3.5t trailer behind, giving an 11 ton gross weight driven with a car driving license.

No. He'd need c+e to tow behind a 7.5t and the truck would be plated with the total train weight.
 

Kidds

Member
Horticulture
How is the cpc administered?
I’m not even sure it is. I did hear that it wasn’t but no doubt they throw the book at someone now and then to fear the rest into complying. Pretty much the same as nroso points but less useful.
All you have to do is go and sit in a room for 5 days every 3 years and hand some money over. You only have to be there, no test no fail no need to even understand English. Complete waste of time and money.
 

Tractortech

Member
Location
Cumbria
I’m not even sure it is. I did hear that it wasn’t but no doubt they throw the book at someone now and then to fear the rest into complying. Pretty much the same as nroso points but less useful.
All you have to do is go and sit in a room for 5 days every 3 years and hand some money over. You only have to be there, no test no fail no need to even understand English. Complete waste of time and money.
One day a year on average, or as I did last autumn all 5 days over 2 months before my CPC card expired. They are valid for 5 years.
The driver CPC does seem a waste of time and money. However, it's a bit like the 'Caution, Hot Water' stickers next to the hot tap in service stations and the like stating the obvious. If you scald yourself, you've been told, so only you to blame..
 

JP1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Payload is a good point. The problem for us with something like a cab star is the narrow payload area, as all our veg needs to be palletised. Don’t think something like a transit or sprinter will be any better than pickup and trailer.
Its the cpc element of running a 7.5 tonne which looks like being the biggest PIA, yet if I was to hire one it doesn’t seem that I’d need one? (Not that I would as it would be too expensive). How is the cpc administered?
Which CPC. If you hire one you will need your own O licence and space on it for that vehicle. The driver CPC is personal to the driver for whatever vehicle she/he is driving for financial gain
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
Which CPC. If you hire one you will need your own O licence and space on it for that vehicle. The driver CPC is personal to the driver for whatever vehicle she/he is driving for financial gain
Does the fact that I’d be delivering my own produce have any impact on the requirement for me to have a cpc?
 
Location
southwest
You'll need an O licence --advert in local press inviting objections, Traffic Commissioners will demand you are of "good repute" (no fraud or relevant motoring convictions like overloading, using a mobile while driving but speeding is OK) have a maintenance plan for the truck (6 week inspection by auth workshop) and importantly, the finances to pay for the proper maintenance of the truck.

For "own goods" you don't need an operator CPC, but the driver will need a driver CPC, five days training over 5 years.

Biggest problem will be who drives it if you are not available. There's a reason why agency drivers have a poor reputation.
 

LIVE - DEFRA SFI Janet Hughes “ask me anything” 19:00-20:00 20th September (Today)

  • 12,568
  • 115
Hello, I’m Janet Hughes. I’m the Programme Director for the Future Farming and Countryside Programme in Defra – the programme that’s phasing out the Common Agricultural Policy and introducing new schemes and services for farmers.



Today (20 September) between 7pm-8pm, I and some of my colleagues will be answering your questions about our work including the Sustainable Farming Incentive, Farming in Protected Landscapes, and our test and trials.



We’ll try to answer at least 15 of your top voted questions, so please vote on the questions you’d most like me to answer.



You can read more about our Future Farming policy on our blog.



I’ve answered some of your questions previously: you can watch the videos on...
Top