Rushes

Agrivator

Member
How have you bought it Dereck? Second hand in old milk bottles?:D

I will admit, it seems hugely inconsiderate that the bloody French supply their ag Chems with labels printed in French :devil:
:D:D:D
It's even more irritating that our bloody English manufactures supply our Agchems with labels printed in French - litres and bloody Hectares.
 

JMTHORNLEY

Member
Location
Glossop
Will it matter if the rushes are leggy with this mixture?

Do they want topping first and then the regrowth spraying?
Found the best way for the rush on my farm and I am slowly winning with them now. Top hard, two passes 2-3 weeks apart on the really old large rush patches with a humongous root ball that sticks out the ground. allow a regrowth of soft green brash and then hit hard with the weed wiper and glyphosphate or the MCPA 2.4D mixture if a large area. I have had to do extensive drainage to get to these palces due to poor management for years gone by.... Spread muck so thick you can't see the ground and smother the little barstewards. They die back over 12 months and so far very small regrowth has been hit the MPCA and 2.4D cocktail to again great effect.

Liming will help and also drainage, I have slowly repaired old clay suffs and dug new trenches to help but by no means a permanent fix.
 
Location
Ceredigion
Found the best way for the rush on my farm and I am slowly winning with them now. Top hard, two passes 2-3 weeks apart on the really old large rush patches with a humongous root ball that sticks out the ground. allow a regrowth of soft green brash and then hit hard with the weed wiper and glyphosphate or the MCPA 2.4D mixture if a large area. I have had to do extensive drainage to get to these palces due to poor management for years gone by.... Spread muck so thick you can't see the ground and smother the little barstewards. They die back over 12 months and so far very small regrowth has been hit the MPCA and 2.4D cocktail to again great effect.

Liming will help and also drainage, I have slowly repaired old clay suffs and dug new trenches to help but by no means a permanent fix.
For some fields it's the only option . But hoping the ,weedwipper works.
I've been using MCPA on rushes for 40 years .its half a job . Roundup kills them dead with one hit . You can all argue with me till your blue in the face but that's how it is
 

JMTHORNLEY

Member
Location
Glossop
I go 1:10 in the weedwiper, most possibly to much but fudge it it kills um and it only actually touches the rush so I can live with that
For some fields it's the only option . But hoping the ,weedwipper works.
I've been using MCPA on rushes for 40 years .its half a job . Roundup kills them dead with one hit . You can all argue with me till your blue in the face but that's how it is
As you can see I’m not arguing with you I use round up to great effect with the wiper but as I said on MY farm that’s what Works to GREAT effect
 
If it was me, I would only use the most bad ass premium glyphosate product in a weed wiper and follow the instructions on the label very carefully.

Whether you use the weed wiper or MCPA/both barrels option, you really want to be topping the rushes off first and then attacking the regrowth mid-summer. They will be young, green and growing as hard as they can so you will get maximum effectiveness out of your chosen herbicide. I don't know how much weed wiping is but spraying with MCPA or hormone chemistry is pretty cheap, possibly less than a comparable dockspray.
 

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How to mitigate heat stress in cattle

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Written by John Swire

With temperatures forecast to rise above 25°C, cattle producers should be prepared to mitigate the negative effects of heat stress on their beef and dairy animals.

“Cattle are fairly comfortable when the ambient temperature is between 15°C and 25°C over the summer months but if the thermometer rises significantly, production performance will start to suffer,” warns Jacob Lakin from Azelis Animal Nutrition.

“This is because both a milk production and growing beef animal will start to divert energy away from production performance towards keeping cool. You’ll notice if a cow is struggling during a summer heatwave because she will start to salivate heavily and pant...
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