CVT Transmissions

linga

Member
Location
Ceredigion
Specifically the Subaru lineartronic.
Are they fit for purpose
Do they last ?
Do they behave like the old DAF rubber band things or have the modern ones controlled that sensation of transmission slip?
Do they sap power
Pros and cons etc ?
 

BigBarl

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
South Notts
Mother in law had a civic with a CVT, she didn’t keep it over a year so tells you all you need to know. Reliability no issues but horrible to drive, had to constantly be revving the balls of it to get any performance so can’t be great from an emissions perspective. For me a modern auto box would be a better option in most cases or if you want a CVT look for a full electric.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Specifically the Subaru lineartronic.
Are they fit for purpose
Do they last ?
Do they behave like the old DAF rubber band things or have the modern ones controlled that sensation of transmission slip?
Do they sap power
Pros and cons etc ?
They are fit for purpose. The Subaru application is apparently one of the best and apart from Nissan/Jatco models they do now seem to last a long time. There's little chance of repairing one if it does go wrong though.
I haven't driven a Subaru with their CVT but I believe they can be driven with a step ratio or as a full CVT elastic band experience. They don't sap power, they just feel like they do. They actually need a gentle throttle application to get the best out of them rather than full off-on throttle like some animals drive. Whether you like the experience or not is an individual thing. Try it and see what you think and please do report back.
 

linga

Member
Location
Ceredigion
They are fit for purpose. The Subaru application is apparently one of the best and apart from Nissan/Jatco models they do now seem to last a long time. There's little chance of repairing one if it does go wrong though.
I haven't driven a Subaru with their CVT but I believe they can be driven with a step ratio or as a full CVT elastic band experience. They don't sap power, they just feel like they do. They actually need a gentle throttle application to get the best out of them rather than full off-on throttle like some animals drive. Whether you like the experience or not is an individual thing. Try it and see what you think and please do report back.
I recently had a drive as a passenger in a Nissan Juke with a CVT and it felt fine. Very smooth and no undue revving on acceleration.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
I recently had a drive as a passenger in a Nissan Juke with a CVT and it felt fine. Very smooth and no undue revving on acceleration.
They only rev like crazy when you floor it. This lets the engine produce maximum power while the transmission and road speed catches up.
That Nissan CVT you tried is notoriously unreliable and a bone of contention at one time between Nissan and Jatco. Nissan actually own the majority of Jatco and it must have been serious for Nissan bosses to publicly tell Jatco to pull their finger out to improve their reliability.

If I was confident in the long term reliability of a CVT gearbox, I would buy one. However there have been too many bad experiences over the years and I shy away. Would have bought our Qashqai as a CVT auto until I researched it in depth and bought a manual instead.
 

Wellytrack

Member
Bought a Lexus jeep last year. It has a E-CVT box. No issues whatsoever, much smoother than a DSG type box (have one of them as well) and wouldn’t go back to a manual box.
 

Jon

Member
Location
South Norfolk
They only rev like crazy when you floor it. This lets the engine produce maximum power while the transmission and road speed catches up.
That Nissan CVT you tried is notoriously unreliable and a bone of contention at one time between Nissan and Jatco. Nissan actually own the majority of Jatco and it must have been serious for Nissan bosses to publicly tell Jatco to pull their finger out to improve their reliability.

If I was confident in the long term reliability of a CVT gearbox, I would buy one. However there have been too many bad experiences over the years and I shy away. Would have bought our Qashqai as a CVT auto until I researched it in depth and bought a manual instead.
I've been very pleased with our Qashqai cvt.
How long a service life do these units last ?
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
I've been very pleased with our Qashqai cvt.
How long a service life do these units last ?
How long is a piece of string. All that is known is that they have a seriously high failure rate. Whether they have improved this in the last five years of build is questionable but to be hoped. I wouldn't buy one built before 2016 unless it has had a replacement transmission since, but that is just my personal feeling on it.
I'm sure there are plenty of high mileage examples around that have been no trouble whatsoever.

 
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capfits

Member
Subaru CVT is OK but not enhancing.
Had a shot of one when buying my last Forester. Should add a diesel.

Smooth enough, quiet enough, just felt, well dull really. Acceleration was adequate but not quick. On start up the engine ran a bit quicker for a while, perhaps something to do with getting gearbox oil warm?

Bought a manual instead as
I do not live in town, where it would be nice if I had a commute.
Manual was cheaper, to buy and service.
I actually take mine off road and expect a reasonable mileage in snow, and felt I would have more control if that makes sense.

All that said as the newer ones are hybrids (albeit a bit pointless) as they move to more electrification and full electrification it makes sense as power losses seemed to be minimal when economy figures were looked at.
 

Jon

Member
Location
South Norfolk
How long is a piece of string. All that is known is that they have a seriously high failure rate. Whether they have improved this in the last five years of build is questionable but to be hoped. I wouldn't buy one built before 2016 unless it has had a replacement transmission since, but that is just my personal feeling on it.
I'm sure there are plenty of high mileage examples around that have been no trouble whatsoever.

Ok, thank you.
 

Timbo

Member
Location
Gods County
Specifically the Subaru lineartronic.
Are they fit for purpose
Do they last ?
Do they behave like the old DAF rubber band things or have the modern ones controlled that sensation of transmission slip?
Do they sap power
Pros and cons etc ?
They must have regular fluid changes and the mechatronic unit is well known to fail- but can be replaced from top of bellhousing with engine & box in place (although Subaru say otherwise. )
 

linga

Member
Location
Ceredigion
Thank you all.
I think I had better have a drive in one to see what it’s like.
I have heard that the lineartronic can fail after 100000 miles so maybe a manual the safer option.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
Thank you all.
I think I had better have a drive in one to see what it’s like.
I have heard that the lineartronic can fail after 100000 miles so maybe a manual the safer option.
A manual might fail at 100,000 miles as well. I remember a time, not so long ago, when gearboxes generally needed an overhaul at 50,000 and cars were very unlikely to travel 100,000 before being scrapped. I also know a driver that is so rough with his gearbox that almost every car he drives has the gear-lever break off in his hand at some point and he can't understand why car manufacturers have not sorted gear lever and gearboxes out in this day and age. :eek:
 

linga

Member
Location
Ceredigion
A manual might fail at 100,000 miles as well. I remember a time, not so long ago, when gearboxes generally needed an overhaul at 50,000 and cars were very unlikely to travel 100,000 before being scrapped. I also know a driver that is so rough with his gearbox that almost every car he drives has the gear-lever break off in his hand at some point and he can't understand why car manufacturers have not sorted gear lever and gearboxes out in this day and age. :eek:
Blimey
 

linga

Member
Location
Ceredigion
Do CVTs have engine braking?
How do automatics of all sorts manage downhill as surely as speed rises they would sense a upshift would be wanted when you actually may want to downshift?
 

Timbo

Member
Location
Gods County
Do CVTs have engine braking?
How do automatics of all sorts manage downhill as surely as speed rises they would sense a upshift would be wanted when you actually may want to downshift?
Magically! Simpler ones have just an inclinometer sensor so it knows if the car is pointing up or down hill (might also be combined with a G sensor)

More serious autos using ZF's 8 or 10HP use input from the Sat Nav and GPS sensors to know the topography of the area - they will often change down a cog at the base of an incline or just as you begin to descend a hill, in anticipation, rather reaction.

Plus alot more computing power - if for instance you're pressing on and throwing the car about alittle more (from the G sensor) and there is a series of bends but on level road, they will often hold a lower gear because they know the road. Do the same more calmly and it will stay in a higher gear.

They also monitor throttle angle, rate of attack on the pedal, brake pedal, steering angle and rate of attack on the steering - but the G & GPS sensors are responsible for most of the decisions. BMW & LR switch to different mapping when they sense a plug in the trailer socket.
 

Get ready for pest monitoring, advises PGRO

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham

The Processors and Growers Research Organisation (PGRO) has issued new advice to help growers understand the importance of measuring pest populations before any decisions are made on insecticides. Charlotte Cunningham reports. Ahead of the trapping season, the PGRO has produced a new masterclass video to help growers understand how to trap and assess pest populations. The key advice is that using a range of preventative tools will be crucial for farmers looking to reduce cases of pea and bean weevil, pea moth, and silver Y moth this spring, while finding more sustainable ways of farming in line with new agricultural policy, according to the PGRO’s research and...
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