Maize grain

digger64

Member
[QUOTEpopcorn ound, post: 5979502, member: 610"]Be careful of fusarium in the maize.

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Would propcorn solve that problem ?
 

Green farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Also interested in hearing opinions of maize inclusions in sheep rations and feeds. Ground maize meal is well priced at the moment. Cheaper then barley with less risk of acidosis
 
Are you going to crimp it? It is a lot easier doing that than trying to dry it as you can put it in the silage pit.

Harvest is late, that is the main problem. You don't need to let it go too dry, you could cut it with a forager using a picker header and ensile it. Also a forager is a lot handier in the mud than a combine.
 

Downton_shep

Member
Location
Leintwardine
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All cut and in the grain store now. Got about 80 tonnes of it.
Still not sure if it’s worth the risk feeding to the sheep (n)
 

Green farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Any update feeding ground maize meal to sheep ? Either outwintered ewes or store lambs. What would the maximum inclusion rates in a diet be ?
 
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Green farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
This is the stuff I'm referring to, anyone feed them straight like this and what inclusion rates?
 

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Farmer Roy

Member
Arable Farmer
View attachment 767768 All cut and in the grain store now. Got about 80 tonnes of it.
Still not sure if it’s worth the risk feeding to the sheep (n)
Corn ( maize ) is a very popular sheep drought / supplement feed here. It’s just dribbled in the ground in a long line. High energy & the large size makes it easy for them to eat off the ground. No problem at all feeding it to them.
They don’t need much though. A mate of mine always used to claim a matchbox full of corn would keep a merino wether alive for a day. I don’t know how accurate that is ?

Don’t you have a local Department of Agriculture or something similar you can ask ? Ours publish endless amounts of information on stuff like that
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
This was a couple years ago now. Was a bit worried about feeding it to inlamb ewes so ended up being sold to go in a digester.


Aye I didn't notice the date of your posts... just read the thread when the newest reply came up.

Ground maize is good feed though - same as distillers maize grains, but you're cutting out the distilling and pelleting steps
 

Green farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Corn ( maize ) is a very popular sheep drought / supplement feed here.
They don’t need much though. A mate of mine always used to claim a matchbox full of corn would keep a merino wether alive for a day.

I've heard of lads finishing lambs on barley down the years, but dont know many who finish them of maize, so that's why I'm asking the question. it has a higher energy value then barley, is meant to be safer to feed and can be bought cheaper. I see the more expensive finishing rations all have a high maize quantity.
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
I've heard of lads finishing lambs on barley down the years, but dont know many who finish them of maize, so that's why I'm asking the question. it has a higher energy value then barley, is meant to be safer to feed and can be bought cheaper. I see the more expensive finishing rations all have a high maize quantity.

Maize (distillers) grains are a staple of all our rations. We use it as the primary source of protein for all sheep, fat lambs and the store cattle (to grow them on before sale as forward stores). It is by far the best straight you can buy
 

Green farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
im guessing that’s because there is a lot more barley in the UK than maize ?

I am surprised it’s cheaper than barley, not the case here

I'm only small scale, hobby sized really, but yes, slightly cheaper then barley and about 25% cheaper then lamb rations, which can have cheap filler in them.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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