MF 165

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
The 236 is far more common than the 212 and also, depending on age and previous application, probably much much smoother running, due to most having sump mounted balancer shafts fitted. Not all have this though. Combine ones did and ran at 2600 rpm and tractors from probably around 1982 also had balancers. Balancers are not perfect, in that they can break their supporting cast bearing carriers. If it works, it works though. Lovely engine of its time. It has a longer stroke and better torque than the 212 and the only difference between it and the 248 is the liner thickness and fuelling. I'm pretty sure you could convert a 236 to a 248 just by changing to the appropriate liners, although I have no experience of this being done.
 
If the 165 with blown engine was mine
I would be pricing up cost of parts and machining to fix original engine then I would know it. would be good .... bit of an unknown quantity fitting s/h engine
 
perkins 212,some went well our neighbours smoked all the time !! he changed it for a 884,,that boiled on hard work,they are now jd, i have a 165 and a 50b digger ,same engine,the digger starts easy mostly without heat, the 165 has to be heated most times, luck of the draw ??
n
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
perkins 212,some went well our neighbours smoked all the time !! he changed it for a 884,,that boiled on hard work,they are now jd, i have a 165 and a 50b digger ,same engine,the digger starts easy mostly without heat, the 165 has to be heated most times, luck of the draw ??
n
The 236 and 248 can also smoke a lot in terms of white smoke, mainly on the over-run. It is down to the DPA injector pump settings. The pump could also cause it to be slow to start but valve wear may be another issue on higher hour or older engines.
Must say I quite liked the 212 in my 165 and it always pulled tolerably well and was never any bother. The 236 fitted to my Ursus, which took over the 165's work was a far better engine though. This one did white smoke a bit down hills though, as if unburnt fuel was puffing out of the exhaust. It smelt like it too.
 

Two Tone

Member
Mixed Farmer
The 236 and 248 can also smoke a lot in terms of white smoke, mainly on the over-run. It is down to the DPA injector pump settings. The pump could also cause it to be slow to start but valve wear may be another issue on higher hour or older engines.
Must say I quite liked the 212 in my 165 and it always pulled tolerably well and was never any bother. The 236 fitted to my Ursus, which took over the 165's work was a far better engine though. This one did white smoke a bit down hills though, as if unburnt fuel was puffing out of the exhaust. It smelt like it too.
My father had a 1969 G reg 165 new and I’m sure the exhaust was on the lhs and I thought it said 4.212 on the air intake manifold (But might be wrong). Could it have been a 4.203 if the exhaust was on the left?

Nearly all the 4.236’s I’ve ever had (175, 675, Manitou MB25P) were a bugger to start when it was cold. Yet that 165 and a 690 with the 4.248 were alway good starters, no matter how cold it got!
 

colhonk

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Darlington
My G reg 165 with 212 engine starts straight away whatever the weather. Sits for days at harvest driving the drier, don`t have to put engine oil in it between changes but, It does have some white smoke out of the exhaust basically all the time. A trace of black smoke if I pull the throttle back but no blue smoke. Had the pump and injectors done years ago and new valve guides and rubber seals but made no difference. The 1200 that I had also put white smoke out all the time, sounds as though it was a bit of a trait with them then.
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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