Dividing grain with big bags of fertiliser

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Maybe a long shot but need to partition my shed down the middle but not permanently. Was thinking concrete A section walling lifted in with telehandler, but thought why not buy my MOP up front and store down the middle. Lay a sheet over it. Only as deep as a bag at edges, heaped up in middle to 3 m. Will the bags slide out under pressure if only loaded one side initially? Ton bags better than 600 kg. Quite a polished finish on the store floor.
 

D14

Member
Maybe a long shot but need to partition my shed down the middle but not permanently. Was thinking concrete A section walling lifted in with telehandler, but thought why not buy my MOP up front and store down the middle. Lay a sheet over it. Only as deep as a bag at edges, heaped up in middle to 3 m. Will the bags slide out under pressure if only loaded one side initially? Ton bags better than 600 kg. Quite a polished finish on the store floor.
Should be fine as we use 3 x 500kg bales as a temporary wall and sheet them. Never had anything move and we go 4m deep at the peak.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
I was thinking MOP as it’s not particularly dangerous, it’s sealed up plus it’s sheeted anyway. I could maybe stretch to some ply board to shutter off the bags. It’s a multi purpose shed so I don’t want anything permanent that can’t be moved easily. Concrete dividers would be the official route but they will be stuck in the road when not needed and why lay out £2k when you don’t need to? Mice shouldn’t be problem as the shed is sealed anyway.
 

the-mad-welder

Member
Location
Suffolk
We did this for years before getting some concrete lego bricks. Row of 600kg bags with sheets of ply either side and lashed the sheets together over the bags. Not perfect but it did a job.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Do it once do it right

Well maybe but if I plan it right I can divide my grain and store my fertiliser at the same time. A lot of farming used to work like that rather than spending on deadweight.
 

DrWazzock

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
So I order concrete. Lots of CO2. Spend time lifting the concrete around annually as i reconfigure the shed. Or I order MOP. Plonk it down to divide my grain store. Load into spreader.
Big saving on CO2. And a cost saving.
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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