Drainage implement for tractor.

Drumbroider

Member
Mixed Farmer
I have a bit of drainage to do on the farm. Usually hire a digger and do it that way. I have been thinking about making a sub spoiler/ mole styles pipe layer. Similar to the one in the picture.

I have seen them for water pipe but not for normal 100mm land drainage pipe. I’d normal use gravel and a trench which is better but takes more time and money. if I could lay it with the tractor faster and it was ok it would be a big advantage.

Has anyone made one?
Did it work?
How much tractor was needed to use it?
Did you go back to the digger method after or keep using it?

If anyone can advise me on whether it’s worth the time and money to make or buy it would be a big help.
 

Exfarmer

Member
Location
Bury St Edmunds
I have a bit of drainage to do on the farm. Usually hire a digger and do it that way. I have been thinking about making a sub spoiler/ mole styles pipe layer. Similar to the one in the picture.

I have seen them for water pipe but not for normal 100mm land drainage pipe. I’d normal use gravel and a trench which is better but takes more time and money. if I could lay it with the tractor faster and it was ok it would be a big advantage.

Has anyone made one?
Did it work?
How much tractor was needed to use it?
Did you go back to the digger method after or keep using it?

If anyone can advise me on whether it’s worth the time and money to make or buy it would be a big help.
Check out a Zor plough
 
I made this up over winter two or three years back, its been out on hire a couple of times and worked well with 4" pipe and gravel. It needs 400hp plus if working over 1mt. I am thinking of making a smaller version for water pipe or cable which would be for sale.
 

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Colliedog

Member
Location
Dorset
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I made this using one of those trenches you buy off the internet. It works really well in sand but as soon as it went in the clay it self destructed and couldn’t keep the bottom of the trench level.
I don’t know what your soil profile is like and if you are back filling with stone but consider using a professional contractor. It was the best money I spent on my drainage project. 40 years of experience sat on a laser guided trencher meant every drain worked and a lot of money was saved by not putting in unnecessary runs.
 

Drumbroider

Member
Mixed Farmer
View attachment 866582
I made this using one of those trenches you buy off the internet. It works really well in sand but as soon as it went in the clay it self destructed and couldn’t keep the bottom of the trench level.
I don’t know what your soil profile is like and if you are back filling with stone but consider using a professional contractor. It was the best money I spent on my drainage project. 40 years of experience sat on a laser guided trencher meant every drain worked and a lot of money was saved by not putting in unnecessary runs.

My place is predominantly clay. Not a lot of rocks and all the ground has a good run on it so at least have that going for me.

I did have a look at that idea. Never used one so good to hear they are not much use in clay. Is it the general idea that’s no good in clay or is it Just that particular machine?
 

Colliedog

Member
Location
Dorset
It had just about enough power. I made the headstock in a hurry and that wasn’t really man enough the biggest problem was the scraper kept bending. Fine for a water pipe or electric cable just not commercial scale land drainage.
you have obviously done a bit already so you will already know the expensive bit is the stone which you will need for clay ground. My first saving by using a professional was the narrow chain reducing the stone per meter. Then he knew the best angles to come across the slopes in order to catch the most water. His Trencher had clocked up over 40,000 hours in it’s ‘triggers broom’ lifespan but it’s shear size and weight and the fact it could change in any plain to keep the the trench level and on the perfect run all guided by a laser set up in the corner of the field made me realise I would never bother to try it myself again.
Here’s my first proper drain going in.
 

njneer

Member
We had a thing called a “Daisy D” about thirty years ago .
Was basically a big subsoiler with a mounted reel to hold a roll of wavy coil ,It had like a funnell
Type arrangement on top of the beam to feed the pipe in .
You started at the ditch and ploughed and it self fed the pipe in as you drove .
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
How on earth do you get an exact fall with these things? Mine have all been put in with a trencher running a laser since the 1970's (there is a new GPS gizmo now that calculates each run for max fall and minimum stone) some of my fields have had only 300mm of fall to play with, and the odd run put in dead level to keep enough cover.
 

Drumbroider

Member
Mixed Farmer
We had a thing called a “Daisy D” about thirty years ago .
Was basically a big subsoiler with a mounted reel to hold a roll of wavy coil ,It had like a funnell
Type arrangement on top of the beam to feed the pipe in .
You started at the ditch and ploughed and it self fed the pipe in as you drove .

yeah that’s what I was hoping to make. But from what everyone is saying don’t have the HP for it. Got about 150hp for it. Big HP tractors aren’t really used around me as the land is more lowland grazing, not arable. But it will be the lack of weight that’s also an issue. Plus whatever I do will need gravel as if you lay straight in the clay it’s not gonna do much.
 

Drumbroider

Member
Mixed Farmer
aft trencher goes behind 140hp easy and by far the cheapest just need a digger to initiate start or ditch and operator with that skill called common sense who doesnt try to make water run uphill

they look the part. Don’t have the budget for a new one of those unfortunate. But if I see something similar second hand it may be worth a shot.
 

Top cereal and oilseed growers honoured at the Yield Enhancement Network Awards 2021

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Despite an average growing year for most crops, many growers managed to go above and beyond their predicted max yields, with Lincolnshire grower Tim Lamyman taking the top spots for his wheat yields and his world record breaking winter barley yield.

The highest cereal and oilseed yields achieved at harvest 2021 were announced at this year’s Yield Enhancement Network (YEN) Awards on Wednesday 24th November at the Croptec Show. With award presentations by Tom Bradshaw, Vice President of NFU, 24 farms took home the evening’s top awards for highest yield and highest potential yield achieved for wheat, winter and spring barley, oats, and oilseed. The 2021 winners came from all corners of the UK, as well as from as far afield as Finland and New Zealand.

Familiar names from 2020 made the...
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