Rent agreement

Sam myers

Member
Mixed Farmer
Evening everybody,

got the chance of taking on a bit of grassland but need to come to an agreement on price per acre. 10 acre of old grass lays currently full of rubbish. The agreement is I will do the hedge cutting, any upkeep, buy and apply all fertiliser and I will receive any BPS. More than likely make hay from the grass once I get it cleaned up. My question is, with all this considered what would be a fair price for both parties? Based in North Yorkshire

thanks a lot everybody
 

Sam myers

Member
Mixed Farmer
Nothing would be a good starting point down here.
Make sure you have an agreement that you have it for a minimum of five years and preferably ten as they will want it back once you have spent all the money tidying it up.
Has no one told you that the BPS is disappearing?
Yeah understand they are slowly doing away with it but with a few years left I might at well receive it as he cannot as he doesn’t farm it he is just a land owner
 

Electricfencer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Cotswolds
50 with no bps sounds not to bad, can you rent grass for less?
You can round here. Weedy permanent pasture is between £20 (fences) and free (needs electric).
image.jpg
I’m not paying anything for this because they have the bps and I have paid to top it.
 

goodevans

Member
Yeah probably. But most grass land is sh!t because if it was half decent it would have corn on it. The ironic part is it some of the most expensive in the country.
Fields like the one you show certainly wouldn't be free in South Shropshire,and probably carry a good rent in the winter on top of £50/ 100 in summer and dearer still nearer the Welsh border
 

Electricfencer

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Cotswolds
Fields like the one you show certainly wouldn't be free in South Shropshire,and probably carry a good rent in the winter on top of £50/ 100 in summer and dearer still nearer the Welsh border
They are flood plains so no good in the winter, you can’t really keep cattle because of tb and there is shortage of young people wanting to farm sheep. Therefore demand is low hence I don’t pay anything but I do have to electric it and maintain the electric (a big job this year) to keep my little welsh darlings in.
 

Anymulewilldo

Member
Livestock Farmer
There are clearly plenty of farmers round you (& me) who need new batteries in their calculators!
HA! Come up Cheshire. That will open your eyes. The stupid baskets just don’t know when too stop. The only times you can get in is where the dairy boys can’t get with big tackle or you have the inside track on the tenders.
 
Its quite funny, I used to crow about my cheap rents in areas..... and then folk started to move in. I’ve learnt from my mistakes now 😆 I can travel anywhere in the uk for a big enough block of cheap grazing, and if it’s too far, can always pay some one local to looker. So be careful advertising too much 😂

Have sheep, will travel.
 

Sam myers

Member
Mixed Farmer
We've taken on 38 acres that is fenced, watered landlord claims the subsidy and we make hay, graze some sheep and look after the fences + hedges. Its location, location
What price are you paying per acre for that, if any at all? If you don’t mind me asking
 

LIVE - DEFRA SFI Janet Hughes “ask me anything” 19:00-20:00 20th September (Today)

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Hello, I’m Janet Hughes. I’m the Programme Director for the Future Farming and Countryside Programme in Defra – the programme that’s phasing out the Common Agricultural Policy and introducing new schemes and services for farmers.



Today (20 September) between 7pm-8pm, I and some of my colleagues will be answering your questions about our work including the Sustainable Farming Incentive, Farming in Protected Landscapes, and our test and trials.



We’ll try to answer at least 15 of your top voted questions, so please vote on the questions you’d most like me to answer.



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I’ve answered some of your questions previously: you can watch the videos on...
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