Triton Drill - design discussion

This being a difficult sowing autumn if the Triton drill design has real advantages it will be highlighted later in growing year and harvest results which if managed correctly they could be taken seriously as a manufacturer. I suppose time will tell but from what I see of their marketing and website they have far to go.
 

traineefarmer

Member
Location
Mid Norfolk
This being a difficult sowing autumn if the Triton drill design has real advantages it will be highlighted later in growing year and harvest results which if managed correctly they could be taken seriously as a manufacturer. I suppose time will tell but from what I see of their marketing and website they have far to go.
Exactly. This is the perfect year for Triton to prove their concept. They should be getting as many machines as possible on demo around the country on varied soil types in difficult conditions. Then videos and pictures of the growing crops.

Then rather than banging-on on social media about bonkers yield boasts and Aminio A - that is slowly making them a laughing stock - they can prove that theirs is a drill that can sow a viable crop when others cannot. If that isn't a sales winner, I don't know what is.

Yield increases need to be proven over several years across several farms. To recover from their crazy boasts, Triton first need to prove they aren't selling snake oil.
 
Do they actually have demo machines ?
I would like to see it working here , it also looks like an ideal bean drill .
I wonder where it would drill beans especially winters. It doesn't look heavy enough to get them in deep without the ground being moved first and the legs aren't going to pull it in either.
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
Well if I was Triton I certainly would not be offering demo's


In a season like this, the number of time wasters just wanting to get some wheat it would be long and I don't many (if any) would buy to return the favour ! If I was them I would happily demo as a contractor however

It clearly works in the extreme wet, as does a weaving sabre tine, kv tine seeder and any other simple multi-row tine drill without a tyre packer. I' not sure any of these methods are how anyone WANTS to be drilling and question if what they offer over simply broadcasting and harrowing in ? But in an extreme year like this, we are left with little choice so a market does exist
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
I wonder where it would drill beans especially winters. It doesn't look heavy enough to get them in deep without the ground being moved first and the legs aren't going to pull it in either.

why is everyone obsessed with drilling beans deep ? 3" with our 750a was never a problem, deep enough to be out of crows reach! don't need to be any deeper now we no longer have simazine surely
 

Spud

Member
Location
YO62
why is everyone obsessed with drilling beans deep ? 3" with our 750a was never a problem, deep enough to be out of crows reach! don't need to be any deeper now we no longer have simazine surely
In the -10 frosts of 2010, winter beans sown with a combi (as we did back then) anything less than 2" died. In the softer areas of the field where they were a bit deeper, they were better, but still crap. Not had a serious test since then, but 4-5" with the Kockerling has given us better crops than ploughing them in at 6" deep or combi at 2"

Just my experience.

Currently rigging our Kockerling up with narrower points, and thinking if we get a window before christmas we'll drill them 3-4" deep.
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
In the -10 frosts of 2010, winter beans sown with a combi (as we did back then) anything less than 2" died. In the softer areas of the field where they were a bit deeper, they were better, but still crap. Not had a serious test since then, but 4-5" with the Kockerling has given us better crops than ploughing them in at 6" deep or combi at 2"

Just my experience.

Currently rigging our Kockerling up with narrower points, and thinking if we get a window before christmas we'll drill them 3-4" deep.

2" is too shallow I agree - 3 -4" is absolutely fine though and any drill will do that depth although some seem obsessed with putting them in a plough depth ............... mostly because they always have


750a was good for about 3" direct - can get them in 4" with the Avatar but not sure I need to
 

JimAndy

Member
Location
portadown
It clearly works in the extreme wet, as does a weaving sabre tine, kv tine seeder and any other simple multi-row tine drill without a tyre packer. I' not sure any of these methods are how anyone WANTS to be drilling and question if what they offer over simply broadcasting and harrowing in ? But in an extreme year like this, we are left with little choice so a market does exist
forgive me if i pick this up wrong, but i take it you not a fan of tine drills, as i Farmer looking to change his drill over the next year, and had a look at dale and the weaving sabre. what are the disadvantage of such drills in your views
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
forgive me if i pick this up wrong, but i take it you not a fan of tine drills, as i Farmer looking to change his drill over the next year, and had a look at dale and the weaving sabre. what are the disadvantage of such drills in your views
I don’t really have an opinion on the drill itself other than I can see it would run in wetter conditions than any drill with a packer would.

what I find frankly hilarious is the way it’s marketed and the utterly ridiculous claims re yields and work rates, sales to AHBD etc

As I said it’s not unique - front tank Dale, weaving sabre time and other similar designs would all offer similar wet conditions performance I expect

such designs could get a farmer out of trouble in a bad season like this, then again so could a fert spreader and cultivator ! What I’ve done with my CO and front hopper is not dissimilar but that a design born from desperation not aspiration !

I won’t be buying one any time soon, it disturbs far to much soil for my liking and lacks critical consolidation and good depth control needed in more normal drilling conditions
 

JimAndy

Member
Location
portadown
so your issues is with this company and it design, you nothing against tine drill in general except they move too much soil for you liking
 

farenheit

Member
Location
Midlands
I mean, should we even be discussing the design...seems to me like this is in breach of the patent rules, I'm not sure any of us could even contemplate selling our wheat legally having thought about this?

@Clive, time to put some of your £340m M6 cash in to our legal kitty. We're gonna need it. I've been drinking up to 4 pints of Amino A a night worrying about the lawyers.
 

Clive

Staff Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lichfield
so your issues is with this company and it design, you nothing against tine drill in general except they move too much soil for you liking
If I wanted (needed) to drill into extreme wet this kind of drill is what you need

I would buy a weaving or other brand (there are loads of front hopper / mounted tine options) in preference however on the basis that you can’t believe a word Triton say due to their more than ridiculous claims on both TFF and Twitter
 

Beefsmith

Member
The blade coulter idea and the closing tine idea using side pressure is brilliant but from there upwards it’s absolutely aweful. Crude design and very unimpressive and the marketing is just hilarious. If they turned the frame design and fabrication etc over to the likes of Agriweld, sumo etc and we’re more realistic with there claims I do think they are definitely onto something so far as to say I would buy at back half to run with my existing front tank but as an engineer I cannot buy the current abomination of a frame etc it’s aweful which is sad as here we have something that Is British and very clever.
You’d buy it for the coulters though as that’s the important bit. What it looks like is irrelevant to the job it would be purchased to do. Like I said in the op, it’s crude but pretty clever.
 
Location
E Yorks
You’d buy it for the coulters though as that’s the important bit. What it looks like is irrelevant to the job it would be purchased to do. Like I said in the op, it’s crude but pretty clever.
To a certain extent yes but it isn’t just what it looks like the frame it’s the poor frame design and layout (wheels hung outback) that I just can’t stand and there is no way I would buy a new machine to cut it to bits as drastically as it needs is plain crackers I’d sooner buy the coulters and do it my self but as they make it quite plain they won’t play that game then I’ll leave it and watch the hilarity for now
 

Deutzdx3

Member
I don’t really have an opinion on the drill itself other than I can see it would run in wetter conditions than any drill with a packer would.

what I find frankly hilarious is the way it’s marketed and the utterly ridiculous claims re yields and work rates, sales to AHBD etc

As I said it’s not unique - front tank Dale, weaving sabre time and other similar designs would all offer similar wet conditions performance I expect

such designs could get a farmer out of trouble in a bad season like this, then again so could a fert spreader and cultivator ! What I’ve done with my CO and front hopper is not dissimilar but that a design born from desperation not aspiration !

I won’t be buying one any time soon, it disturbs far to much soil for my liking and lacks critical consolidation and good depth control needed in more normal drilling conditions
No sure why they haven’t made even the 3m trailed versions for better seed depth control. I get in the conditions they think it’s good for drilling in a trailer would bog the tractor but at least you could unhook easily and drive off. Strange they don’t even offer a rear Packer be it bar or wheel.
 

clbarclay

Member
Location
Worcestershire
Just adding a rear packer does not necessarily equal better depth control. I had one briefly on my mounted tine drill and quickly changed to depth wheels in amongst the times. With just a rear roller and top link the distance between the front times and the roller was enough for the front times to ride out of the ground several inches whe drilling rougher fields. Now the worst case depth variation from that has more than halved.

Unless you do like simtech, bunch up the rows and have the rear times set into the packer, I think rear rollers are best used in combination with front rollers.

Also when I was using the roller, it would ride the drill up a lot more over any lumps of trash.
 
The pity is there is a good rationale behind the design but the Tryiton thing as a whole is just farcical. Being on a very wet silt/clay soil any drilling is vulnerable to rain if consolidated, more so in the spring as the soils are wetter then. This year I got half my acreage in but had a premonition and jumped ship to plough/combi and i'm glad I did. Would a Tryiton have helped this year? well probably not as here the top becomes so slick you would need straikes to move which is where ploughing scores.
I have no problem with ploughing this year as the land suffered from lack of cover two years ago and needed moving to settle some of the silt.
Back to design, the drainage channel and lack of top sealing would be great here if you could pull it as, as I say seed dies from lack of air here if top consolidated and it turns wet. Conversely if it's on top the birds have it. All I need now is something that would move on top to pull it.
 

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