Barn conversion

Forever Fendt

Member
Location
Derbyshire
Good idea. I’ve some stables to do and the question was asked if the panels could be faced like that
I suppose if the bought in brick slips were used I could notch the panels to make them flush to the steels
How about use the std slips bonded on the panels and then get some blues cut thicker for the steels and stand them out a bit like a pillar maybe 40mm and finish with a plinth brick on top will add a bit of detail and act as an expansion joint also
 
How about use the std slips bonded on the panels and then get some blues cut thicker for the steels and stand them out a bit like a pillar maybe 40mm and finish with a plinth brick on top will add a bit of detail and act as an expansion joint also
Whenever anyone say Brick Plinth my first thought is of the travelling fraternity. Whenever we are doing anything for them whether it is a day room, stables or dwelling it always has to have a 900mm chamfered top brick plinth all the way round!
 
Location
Suffolk
Black mortar and slightly raked joints IMO would look good. Alternatively you could make the steels features in the Staffords and have black columns and as mentioned slightly more proud than the reds.
SS
 

dubs

Member
On some of your first pics it looks like you cut down the concrete panels, was it easy to do and how did you cut them.
Wanting to cut some of our panels down in one of our sheds to try and get more air to circulate
 

Forever Fendt

Member
Location
Derbyshire
On some of your first pics it looks like you cut down the concrete panels, was it easy to do and how did you cut them.
Wanting to cut some of our panels down in one of our sheds to try and get more air to circulate
we used a stihll saw diamond blade and plenty of water don't under estimate how heavy the bits are you cut of could still do you some serious damage. It was hard work indeed we did 128 ft. Have you thought about raising the ridge on your building and having a letter box slot just slow the gutter at the eaves we have built them like this before and been very successful
 

Ukjay

Member
Location
Monmouthshire!
They're drilled through the studding , should hold them
I was curious as it could prove to be a noisy system in use, as the expansion and contraction is a factor to be aware of as it can prove to be a possible nuisance, but it is up to the OP how he leaves it.


All the pipes are packed with the insulation stuff still have the option of adding mineral wool would you ? View attachment 884344View attachment 884345
What is the pipe work for, is there a central heating boiler on the other side, thus is it a mixture of heating / hot and cold water pipework in there?

If it contains heating pipework / hot water pipes, I believe you are supposed to protect electric cables from hot pipework to avoid overheating the cable and it has some negative influence on the cable duty rating, so ideally you may wish to isolate that from the hot pipes before you close it all up.

Also, if you have hot pipework under /alongside cold pipes, I would lag them to prevent heating the cold water pipework, because if you are renting that out - you may get annoying calls to sort out warm water coming out of the cold taps for a while, as it looks a nice conversion and whilst it is able to be done I would say it would be worth it for prevention.
 
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Agricultural contractors and their role in the farming industry

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Agricultural contractors and their role in the farming industry

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Will is joined by Ian Maddever, an agricultural contracting expert, and Charlie Yorke from NFU Mutual to talk about agricultural contracting, how the industry has changed and the role it now plays in the farming industry.

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