Born Mucky

Anymulewilldo

Member
Livestock Farmer
Agree the flystrike.
Was there actually a lambing flock, or were we to infer that those were ewe hogs out of the 500 bought in stores, that had dropped lambs?
It was better this week I felt, but I wish they would lose the dramatic false jeopardy.
I'm only a common sheep farmer but I reckon they were ewe lambs that were served by a Suffolk mule or a Suffolk x texel rig lamb. Looked that sort of thing, the one with horns was definitely that type of lamb. I went through all ours as we weaned and the stores as they came, pulled 17 tups and chasers out. Then the other day we were drawing fat and I spotted a bull headed one ?? two stones. God knows how many he's served.

The Mrs says I'm just sad that I can watch sheep on the tv and spot fly strike in the corner of the screen.
 
I'm only a common sheep farmer but I reckon they were ewe lambs that were served by a Suffolk mule or a Suffolk x texel rig lamb. Looked that sort of thing, the one with horns was definitely that type of lamb. I went through all ours as we weaned and the stores as they came, pulled 17 tups and chasers out. Then the other day we were drawing fat and I spotted a bull headed one ?? two stones. God knows how many he's served.

The Mrs says I'm just sad that I can watch sheep on the tv and spot fly strike in the corner of the screen.
A couple of years ago, I missed a very plain Hampshire x tup lamb and he ran with the ewe hoggs 'too small to tup' well into December. About 50% lambed in May, with very little assistance required. Decent lambs too (y)
 

farenheit

Member
Location
Midlands
I liked all the people working in the kitchen "didn't have any experience" but hope they had a food hygiene certificate between them! At least I hope they knew about the segregation of gluten free/vegetarian products from meat products (I don't!).
 

JSmith

Member
Livestock Farmer
Aye, it would. I remember seeing a picture in FG of Henson taking delivery of a big load of equipment from IAE (?). He was shaking hands with their boss man in front of the lorry. I wonder how much discount he got? ?
Your dead right, I bet he’s got a hundred jackets in the closet with a different logo on everyone!! I bet country file an tv coverage doesn’t get mentioned much when he’s doing a deal?
 

Anymulewilldo

Member
Livestock Farmer
Right folks, can someone explain why Ian has just spent £6k on females to put with his old bull rather than spending £3.5k on a new bull too run with his known cows and heifers by the old bull?
Surely the idea of having the good bull is too get the heifers to run back into the herd? If you are going to beef all the progeny use a cheaper bull or a different breed altogether?
 
Right folks, can someone explain why Ian has just spent £6k on females to put with his old bull rather than spending £3.5k on a new bull too run with his known cows and heifers by the old bull?
Surely the idea of having the good bull is too get the heifers to run back into the herd? If you are going to beef all the progeny use a cheaper bull or a different breed altogether?
It’s TV, it’s entertainment, everything is about drama, it wouldn’t surprise me one bit if it was his intention to buy some females all along and the rest was all for dramatic effect.
 

David.

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
J11 M40
Anyone continued watching this to the end, last one was a bit of a classic for avid RT transgression watchers, Tom's heap of spring barley at 49C, not a pedestal or fan in sight, big bags of seed corn stacked on stored grain, dog running about on the heap of "bread" wheat whilst he was testing it, at least dog didn't do the usual trick, and deposit a turd that he had been baking for a fortnight awaiting a heap of corn to lay it in :ROFLMAO: .
 

renewablejohn

Member
Location
lancs
Anyone continued watching this to the end, last one was a bit of a classic for avid RT transgression watchers, Tom's heap of spring barley at 49C, not a pedestal or fan in sight, big bags of seed corn stacked on stored grain, dog running about on the heap of "bread" wheat whilst he was testing it, at least dog didn't do the usual trick, and deposit a turd that he had been baking for a fortnight awaiting a heap of corn to lay it in :ROFLMAO: .
Certainly thought it was a bit of part time farming with his soya beans. Already October and you have a break in weather to get one field harvested yet you stop and "hope" the sh!t weather forecast for the following day does not happen. Would not happen here that combine would have been running all night or at least until it broke down. Agree with the pedestal its not rocket science.
 

David.

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
J11 M40
He did say the next day that the heavens opened as harvester left the field, but I had been thinking the same.
 

Early moves to target wild oats

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Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

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Miss Wood urges...
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