Cabs rusting

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
While cabs are far better built nowadays than they were back in the 1970's and 80's there is still one remaining black spot. There may be more but this is the only common rust issue I know of. It is the roof of MF tractors. They are made of thin mild steel and they rust like heck. This just isn't good enough and there's none of that on my much older Same and New Holland tractors which have a plastic skin. The Same is eleven years older and the NH seven. None of them are perfect but in this particular respect, and considering that is has been a well known issue for literally decades, MF really do need to pull their finger out.

What's brought this topic up is that I went up to the top of my 2004 MF tractor yesterday and found rust. When I cleaned it up I found that there was a large rotten area that had rusted right through. Now this tractor spends most, though not all inactive time in a large well-ventilated shed and three months of the year stored in that shed, not being used.
This kind of 1970's pee-poor quality is just not good enough in this day and age as I don't think they have improved the issue between 2004 and now. They could easily galvanise the sheet metal or make it out of plastic, so why don't they? Because we've let them get away with penny-pinching for far too long, that's why.

The answer could be to change the tractor, but the rest of it is great. Touch wood. I'll be inspecting the top of the new 8S carefully to see whether they have changed their ways. 'Don't spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar', which is literally pertinent.
 
Last edited:

Speedstar

Member
Location
Scottish Borders
While cabs are far better built nowadays than they were back in the 1970's and 80's there is still one remaining black spot. There may be more but this is the only common rust issue I know of. It is the roof of MF tractors. They are made of thin mild steel and they rust like heck. This just isn't good enough and there's none of that on my much older Same and New Holland tractors which have a plastic skin. The Same is eleven years older and the NH seven. None of them are perfect but in this particular respect, and considering that is has been a well known issue for literally decades, MF really do need to pull their finger out.

What's brought this topic up is that I went up to the top of my 2004 MF tractor yesterday and found rust. When I cleaned it up I found that there was a large rotten area that had rusted right through. Now this tractor spends most, though not all inactive time in a large well-ventilated shed and three months of the year stored in that shed, not being used.
This kind of 1970's pee-poor quality is just not good enough in this day and age as I don't think they have improved the issue between 2004 and now. They could easily galvanise the sheet metal or make it out of plastic, so why don't they? Because we've let them get away with penny-pinching for far too long, that's why.

The answer could be to change the tractor, but the rest of it is great. Touch wood. I'll be inspecting the top of the new 8S carefully to see whether they have changed their ways. 'Don't spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar', which is literally pertinent.
very common problem on Mf cabs roofs if not washed & clean go rotten , you need to wash it more often
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
My 565's cab roof hasn't rusted through, they knew how to make them back then
Most have. I had to repaint my 590's cab roof but it was certainly made of thick sheet steel. The big rust points on that age of cab, whether MF500 or Ford **00 which were both made side by side by GKN at Telford, were the many faricated and welded pressed steel enclosed box sections. Most have rusted out long ago. You won't find cabs like that being made these days and most of that type were phased out in the early 1990's in favour of extruded tube structural frames with sheets attached as a single skin. This change was made specifically due to corrosion issues making the earlier type unfit for purpose in terms of long term structural integrity.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
very common problem on Mf cabs roofs if not washed & clean go rotten , you need to wash it more often
Salt air here doesn't help, although over the years I've seen horrendous roofs, for instance some 4200 tractors were crumbling away to red dust at least 15 years ago.
There's no excuse for it. It's just poor roof design amplified by poor rust protection.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
very common problem on Mf cabs roofs if not washed & clean go rotten , you need to wash it more often
It gets the same sort of maintenance and cleaning as the Same and NH. Different design. All most people will ask is which is the better, longer lasting design and brand.

In all other respects I can't fault the MF's much. I like them very much, but I do call out what I see as something that should be improved wherever and whatever it is.
 

Henarar

Member
Livestock Farmer
Most have. I had to repaint my 590's cab roof but it was certainly made of thick sheet steel. The big rust points on that age of cab, whether MF500 or Ford **00 which were both made side by side by GKN at Telford, were the many faricated and welded pressed steel enclosed box sections. Most have rusted out long ago. You won't find cabs like that being made these days and most of that type were phased out in the early 1990's in favour of extruded tube structural frames with sheets attached as a single skin. This change was made specifically due to corrosion issues making the earlier type unfit for purpose in terms of long term structural integrity.
The 565 has been a bit brown with rust since we had it about 35 years ago, never been painted and would have lived outside till about 10 years ago.
The 3060 was rusty on the roof when we had it, it came off a pig farm on the tanker, I cleaned it of and painted it and its been ok though could probably do with doing again, 3075 is fine as is the 4355 and the 6270.
You are right in so much as they shouldn't rust through as quick as yours has
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
The 565 has been a bit brown with rust since we had it about 35 years ago, never been painted and would have lived outside till about 10 years ago.
The 3060 was rusty on the roof when we had it, it came off a pig farm on the tanker, I cleaned it of and painted it and its been ok though could probably do with doing again, 3075 is fine as is the 4355 and the 6270.
You are right in so much as they shouldn't rust through as quick as yours has
It's not something new. Fifteen years ago it was something I inspected on every potential part exchange tractor. It started getting to be an issue with the 4200 series and even before that on the French 3000 series. The 600 series were on a whole different level of course, with more extensive rust issues, using an Italian cab.
 

jd24

Member
While cabs are far better built nowadays than they were back in the 1970's and 80's there is still one remaining black spot. There may be more but this is the only common rust issue I know of. It is the roof of MF tractors. They are made of thin mild steel and they rust like heck. This just isn't good enough and there's none of that on my much older Same and New Holland tractors which have a plastic skin. The Same is eleven years older and the NH seven. None of them are perfect but in this particular respect, and considering that is has been a well known issue for literally decades, MF really do need to pull their finger out.

What's brought this topic up is that I went up to the top of my 2004 MF tractor yesterday and found rust. When I cleaned it up I found that there was a large rotten area that had rusted right through. Now this tractor spends most, though not all inactive time in a large well-ventilated shed and three months of the year stored in that shed, not being used.
This kind of 1970's pee-poor quality is just not good enough in this day and age as I don't think they have improved the issue between 2004 and now. They could easily galvanise the sheet metal or make it out of plastic, so why don't they? Because we've let them get away with penny-pinching for far too long, that's why.

The answer could be to change the tractor, but the rest of it is great. Touch wood. I'll be inspecting the top of the new 8S carefully to see whether they have changed their ways. 'Don't spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar', which is literally pertinent.
I dont know how well i would fair if i rolled our old 3095....roll cage =rust cage
 

Suckndiesel

Member
Location
Newtownards
A friend runs various 6400 Masseys, reckons the ones without sunroofs are better as there are less places for dirt to sit and cause rust.

Had a 1988 3070 from new, there were holes though the roof at 12 years old and mudguards half rotted of it. It was strange on the 2 3000 series we had on the rear mudguards it was the black bit of the rear mudguard on the left hand side and the red bit on the right hand side on both tractors that rotted first!
 

harrow

Member
While cabs are far better built nowadays than they were back in the 1970's and 80's there is still one remaining black spot. There may be more but this is the only common rust issue I know of. It is the roof of MF tractors. They are made of thin mild steel and they rust like heck. This just isn't good enough and there's none of that on my much older Same and New Holland tractors which have a plastic skin. The Same is eleven years older and the NH seven. None of them are perfect but in this particular respect, and considering that is has been a well known issue for literally decades, MF really do need to pull their finger out.

What's brought this topic up is that I went up to the top of my 2004 MF tractor yesterday and found rust. When I cleaned it up I found that there was a large rotten area that had rusted right through. Now this tractor spends most, though not all inactive time in a large well-ventilated shed and three months of the year stored in that shed, not being used.
This kind of 1970's pee-poor quality is just not good enough in this day and age as I don't think they have improved the issue between 2004 and now. They could easily galvanise the sheet metal or make it out of plastic, so why don't they? Because we've let them get away with penny-pinching for far too long, that's why.

The answer could be to change the tractor, but the rest of it is great. Touch wood. I'll be inspecting the top of the new 8S carefully to see whether they have changed their ways. 'Don't spoil the ship for a ha'porth of tar', which is literally pertinent.
If it lasted too long you would never buy a new one :D
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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