Health and safety

mf298

Member
Too soon to comment, but I don’t think that the ear defenders will be anything more than a minor contributory factor. The big question is why people were working on or near an active track.
Let's not jump to conclusions on this one until facts are known from RAIB investigation, but just reflect on the fact that two normal working guys went to work and now will never come home. Just take the time to make sure what you are doing is safe.
 

Bloders

Member
Location
Ruabon
Too soon to comment, but I don’t think that the ear defenders will be anything more than a minor contributory factor. The big question is why people were working on or near an active track.
working "red zone" is relatively common and indeed alomost necessary at times so you can see the effect of your work as a train passess past. Ive done it quite a bit in the past.

As above, we dont know the facts, other than two poor fellas have not made it home tonight to their families.
 

Lincoln75

Member
I am not a fool. I know what you are saying. There have been improvements that have safeguarded the workforce. I don't dispute that.

But I maintain that if we worked to rule the system would grind to a halt.

Some times a risk has to be taken. I have seen it done at the highest level. And it has paid off. I went to Iran. I flew on Russian aircraft that weren't really airworthy and traveled on buses with no brakes, no indicators and no lights. We were driven by drunk drivers and had many collisions. It was a calculated risk. Without such risks there would be no progress, no orders to keep the factories busy. We'd all be sitting at home saying we couldn't do it because of health and safety. We stayed in hotels that were regularly sprayed with bullets and ate from freezers that only worked for half the time but nothing was ever thrown away.

And it gives you a buzz. I made it back alive. I took a risk and I made it back through bandits and dodgy transport.

Faint heart never effed a pig as we say in Lincolnshire.
I have no problem with people taking personal risks ,I`ve taken plenty myself, it`s when others are put at risk I get angry , ie employers putting staff at risk , the construction industry thought they could do as they pleased many years ago , now its regulated very heavily , if farmers dont get their house in order it will be done for them by civil servants..at great expense.
 

Farmer_Joe

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
The North
do your own walk round assessment, best with another set of eyes, record dangers observed and actions to mitigate them. Cost nothing but you time but keep the audit for future reference.
 
3rd July 2019



The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has today released its annual figures for work-related fatal injuries for 2018/19 as well as the number of people known to have died from the asbestos-related cancer, mesothelioma, in 2017.

The provisional annual data for work-related fatal injuries revealed that
147 workers were fatally injured between April 2018 and March 2019 (a rate
of 0.45 per 100,000 workers).

There has been a long-term reduction in the number of fatalities since
1981. Although 2018/19 saw an increase of 6 workplace fatalities from
2017/18, the number has remained broadly level in recent years.

Following the release, HSE Chair Martin Temple commented:

“Today’s release of workplace fatality statistics is a reminder that
despite the UK’s world leading position in health and safety, we cannot
become complacent as we seek to fulfil our mission in preventing injury,
ill health and death at work.”

The new figures show how fatal injuries are spread across the different
industrial sectors:


· Agriculture, forestry and fishing, and Construction sectors continue to
account for the largest share of fatal injuries to workers (32 and 30
deaths respectively in 2018/19).

The figures also indicate those sectors where the risk of fatal injury is
greatest:


· Agriculture, forestry and fishing and Waste and recycling are the worst
affected sectors, with a rate of fatal injury some 18 times and 17 times
as high as the average across all industries respectively (annual average
rates for 2014/15-2018/19).

HSE Chair Martin Temple commented:

“These statistics also remind us that, in certain sectors of the economy,
workplace death remain worryingly high. Agriculture, forestry and fishing
accounts for a small fraction of the workforce of Great Britain, yet
accounted for over 20 per cent of worker fatalities in the last year. This
is unacceptable and more must be done to prevent such fatalities taking
place.”

“Whatever the sector, we should remember that any change in numbers
provides little comfort to the family, friends and colleagues of the 147
whose lives were cut short this year while doing their job.”

The three most common causes of fatal injuries continue to be; workers
falling from height (40), being struck by a moving vehicle (30) and being
struck by a moving object (16), accounting for nearly 60 per cent of fatal
injuries in 2018/19.

The new figures continued to highlight the risks to older workers; 25 per
cent of fatal injuries in 2018/19 were to workers aged 60 or over, even
though such workers made up only around 10 per cent of the workforce.

In addition, there were also 92 members of the public fatally injured in
incidents connected to work in 2018/2019, approximately a third of which
took place on railways.

Mesothelioma, which is contracted through past exposure to asbestos and is
one of the few work-related diseases where deaths can be counted directly,
killed 2,523 in Great Britain in 2017- a broadly similar number to the
previous five years. The current figures are largely a consequence of
occupational asbestos exposures that occurred before 1980. Annual deaths
are expected to remain broadly at current levels for the rest of the decade
before beginning to reduce in number.

A fuller assessment of work-related ill-health and injuries, drawing on
HSE’s full range of data sources, will be provided as part of the annual
Health and Safety Statistics release on 30 October 2019.
 

Goweresque

Member
Location
North Wilts
3rd July 2019



The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has today released its annual figures for work-related fatal injuries for 2018/19 as well as the number of people known to have died from the asbestos-related cancer, mesothelioma, in 2017.

The provisional annual data for work-related fatal injuries revealed that
147 workers were fatally injured between April 2018 and March 2019 (a rate
of 0.45 per 100,000 workers).

There has been a long-term reduction in the number of fatalities since
1981. Although 2018/19 saw an increase of 6 workplace fatalities from
2017/18, the number has remained broadly level in recent years.

Following the release, HSE Chair Martin Temple commented:

“Today’s release of workplace fatality statistics is a reminder that
despite the UK’s world leading position in health and safety, we cannot
become complacent as we seek to fulfil our mission in preventing injury,
ill health and death at work.”

The new figures show how fatal injuries are spread across the different
industrial sectors:


· Agriculture, forestry and fishing, and Construction sectors continue to
account for the largest share of fatal injuries to workers (32 and 30
deaths respectively in 2018/19).

The figures also indicate those sectors where the risk of fatal injury is
greatest:


· Agriculture, forestry and fishing and Waste and recycling are the worst
affected sectors, with a rate of fatal injury some 18 times and 17 times
as high as the average across all industries respectively (annual average
rates for 2014/15-2018/19).

HSE Chair Martin Temple commented:

“These statistics also remind us that, in certain sectors of the economy,
workplace death remain worryingly high. Agriculture, forestry and fishing
accounts for a small fraction of the workforce of Great Britain, yet
accounted for over 20 per cent of worker fatalities in the last year. This
is unacceptable and more must be done to prevent such fatalities taking
place.”

“Whatever the sector, we should remember that any change in numbers
provides little comfort to the family, friends and colleagues of the 147
whose lives were cut short this year while doing their job.”

The three most common causes of fatal injuries continue to be; workers
falling from height (40), being struck by a moving vehicle (30) and being
struck by a moving object (16), accounting for nearly 60 per cent of fatal
injuries in 2018/19.

The new figures continued to highlight the risks to older workers; 25 per
cent of fatal injuries in 2018/19 were to workers aged 60 or over, even
though such workers made up only around 10 per cent of the workforce.

In addition, there were also 92 members of the public fatally injured in
incidents connected to work in 2018/2019, approximately a third of which
took place on railways.

Mesothelioma, which is contracted through past exposure to asbestos and is
one of the few work-related diseases where deaths can be counted directly,
killed 2,523 in Great Britain in 2017- a broadly similar number to the
previous five years. The current figures are largely a consequence of
occupational asbestos exposures that occurred before 1980. Annual deaths
are expected to remain broadly at current levels for the rest of the decade
before beginning to reduce in number.

A fuller assessment of work-related ill-health and injuries, drawing on
HSE’s full range of data sources, will be provided as part of the annual
Health and Safety Statistics release on 30 October 2019.
A few points:

Firstly those figures include members of the public killed by livestock on rights of way, which are not really farmings responsibility, any more than if you get hit by a lorry on the road its the responsibility of the haulage industry. And it also include children killed on farms, which again is not really related to farming as an industry, as children are killed in accidents in domestic locations - over 60 children under 14 die in home incidents every year.

So of the 39 fatalities listed, 3 were walkers killed by cattle, 2 were children, 1 was a member of the public hit by a landslide (from a forestry site) on a public road and 1 was a member of the public run over by a machine while crossing a farm yard on a right of way.

Secondly of the remaining 32 deaths, 15 were over 60 years old, and another 8 were over 50. Only 9 were from 18 to 49 years of age.

Farming does not have a Health and Safety problem, it has an old(er) people working in dangerous environments problem.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/agriculture/pdf/agriculture-fatal-injuries-1819-summary.pdf
 

roscoe erf

Member
Livestock Farmer
A few points:

Firstly those figures include members of the public killed by livestock on rights of way, which are not really farmings responsibility, any more than if you get hit by a lorry on the road its the responsibility of the haulage industry. And it also include children killed on farms, which again is not really related to farming as an industry, as children are killed in accidents in domestic locations - over 60 children under 14 die in home incidents every year.

So of the 39 fatalities listed, 3 were walkers killed by cattle, 2 were children, 1 was a member of the public hit by a landslide (from a forestry site) on a public road and 1 was a member of the public run over by a machine while crossing a farm yard on a right of way.

Secondly of the remaining 32 deaths, 15 were over 60 years old, and another 8 were over 50. Only 9 were from 18 to 49 years of age.

Farming does not have a Health and Safety problem, it has an old(er) people working in dangerous environments problem.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/agriculture/pdf/agriculture-fatal-injuries-1819-summary.pdf
Farming is like no other industry it’s a workplace and a family home and a playground for the general public
 

snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedford
And back then, a lot more people died in workplace accidents. The improvement in safety in the last few decades has been remarkable with an 85% reduction since 1974.
Generally possibly. But Agriculture has seen no change per 100,000 employed since the 60s. Well over 30 killed last year.
 

Frodo2

Member
A few points:

Firstly those figures include members of the public killed by livestock on rights of way, which are not really farmings responsibility, any more than if you get hit by a lorry on the road its the responsibility of the haulage industry. And it also include children killed on farms, which again is not really related to farming as an industry, as children are killed in accidents in domestic locations - over 60 children under 14 die in home incidents every year.

So of the 39 fatalities listed, 3 were walkers killed by cattle, 2 were children, 1 was a member of the public hit by a landslide (from a forestry site) on a public road and 1 was a member of the public run over by a machine while crossing a farm yard on a right of way.

Secondly of the remaining 32 deaths, 15 were over 60 years old, and another 8 were over 50. Only 9 were from 18 to 49 years of age.

Farming does not have a Health and Safety problem, it has an old(er) people working in dangerous environments problem.

http://www.hse.gov.uk/agriculture/pdf/agriculture-fatal-injuries-1819-summary.pdf
Even if you exclude those tragedies, (and I wouldn't) farming still has a health and safety problem.

I believe the average equivalent rate for the oil industry is less than 1.
 

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A lot on the plate for George Eustice

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Written by John Swire

The Tenant Farmers Association (TFA) has welcomed the promotion of George Eustice to become the new DEFRA Secretary of State.

TFA chief executive, George Dunn, said “It’s good to see that the Prime Minister has appointed someone who actually wanted the role rather than it being used either as a stepping-stone to something else or a demotion as has previously been the...
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