How to fill a silage clamp. Newbie buckrake operator!!

So. First year of some 30 silage seasons I've been involved in ,that I am buckraking.

8ft simple buckrake on front of manitou 737.

Pottinger 6010 wagon..

I've seen good and awful buckrake operators over the years here but never done the job myself.

I would really appreciate some top tips..anything from grass moving technique..to methodology of getting best fill. Speed.

Walls are sloped. 16m by 35 m clamp..

Should I ballast the telehandler tyres?

Tia!
 

kiwi pom

Member
Location
canterbury NZ
Are you doing it for yourself or someone else?
If its someone else, ask them how they want the pit. For example, are you layering multi cuts on top of one another.
Fill the sides well and roll well (without getting wedged) keep the ramp fairly steep and short to reduce the distances you have to travel with each push but do layer it properly. If the pits wide enough going round in circles will keep you on the sides all the time. Try and work it so you won't have to carry the last loads all the way to the back.
 
As above - thin layers and roll, roll, roll. You have sloping sides so less of an issue but look after the sides and middle will sort itself. Wagon silage so don’t try pushing through or pushing up a load - take a buckrake full at a time from the tipped load and spread it thinly up the clamp with your buckrake about 6” above the grass. I like to keep our clamps level (rather than a Dorset wedge/ramp) so it is filled in layers so that the ‘profile’ remains the same from start to finish when feeding out.
 

Bill dog

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Scottish Borders
You set the pace of the operas, not Tom Cruise carting the wagon into the clamp. If he tips before you’re ready, give him a bollocking. Wagon silage is a pita to clamp well, so take your time and keep rolling.
Biggest mistake i ever made was aged 17 I politely suggested to my dad he was making an arse of the job. He put the handbrake on, stepped out, and said “ it’s all yours sunshine!” 🤦‍♂️🤦‍♂️😂
 
Make a wedge instead of great big looooong clamp otherwise you’ll be carting it further than the trailers
I beg to differ - that travelling up and down the clamp is the best thing you can do - it means you are constantly rolling the grass. Every situation is different but on an Autumn block dairy unit consistency of feeding is paramount and if the clamp is filled in level layers then the analysis of the silage at feedout remains constant throughout the clamp.
 

Jim75

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Easter ross
If you’re a contractor more likely to be a wedge, saves time. If it’s your own and want it done right narrow layers length of the pit. That’s what we do, pit is approx 40m x 24m I think. Everyone will be different how they want it done. If you get hot under the collar 😇 I put on my tunes or put my phone on silent whatever works for you. Had a shot of a 737 buckraking a couple yrs ago and was very able just a pity about all the pillars in the newer ones for visibilty
 
Thankyou for the tips ! We are doing the silage for ourselves so i guess we can set the rules!

I like the idea of a long flat clamp - we never fill the clamp in one go anyway and it would be good to have 1st cut available throughout the winter . So that is plan 1..

The carrying and dropping as you go is also something i must try as in the past due to longer chop of the wagon previous operators have picked up a lump. Driven. dumped and then spread out. I am not clear yet as to how successfull the dribbling approach will go as buckrake is new and wagon is an upgrade from my venerable 4500. Chop will be better no doubt so that will help hugely. 8 inches between forks..

Are you suggesting that i should only roll the sides? I assume so as i will be driving over the middle to get to the edges!

Should i ballast the tyres?

Tunes are definitely the order of the day.. whisky deffo not !! Cider? probably not!!

wagon loads likely to come in at 4 or 5 n hour so should be plenty of time..

starting next week..
 
Thankyou for the tips ! We are doing the silage for ourselves so i guess we can set the rules!

I like the idea of a long flat clamp - we never fill the clamp in one go anyway and it would be good to have 1st cut available throughout the winter . So that is plan 1..

The carrying and dropping as you go is also something i must try as in the past due to longer chop of the wagon previous operators have picked up a lump. Driven. dumped and then spread out. I am not clear yet as to how successfull the dribbling approach will go as buckrake is new and wagon is an upgrade from my venerable 4500. Chop will be better no doubt so that will help hugely. 8 inches between forks..

Are you suggesting that i should only roll the sides? I assume so as i will be driving over the middle to get to the edges!

Should i ballast the tyres?

Tunes are definitely the order of the day.. whisky deffo not !! Cider? probably not!!

wagon loads likely to come in at 4 or 5 n hour so should be plenty of time..

starting next week..
Sorry, I think we should all have said "concentrate on doing the edges/sides, and the middle will sort itself as you will be constantly running over that bit anyway"

All my buckraking is from wagons - definitely do not try dumping a buckrake-full and then try spreading it!- especially with a buckrake! Even with older, longer material, it will flow well off a push-off buckrake if layered on as you go. Possibly carry the buckrake slightly higher above the deck if its really long.

I buckrake with everything from 130-240 hp depending on what is available - never ballasted tyres and getting compaction of over 700kg/m3 - ballasting can only help but not essential - the key is to keep the layers thin and roll all the time.

If your buckrake is wider than your tractor, cut the ends of the buckrake off!
 
Thankyou for the tips ! We are doing the silage for ourselves so i guess we can set the rules!

I like the idea of a long flat clamp - we never fill the clamp in one go anyway and it would be good to have 1st cut available throughout the winter . So that is plan 1..

The carrying and dropping as you go is also something i must try as in the past due to longer chop of the wagon previous operators have picked up a lump. Driven. dumped and then spread out. I am not clear yet as to how successfull the dribbling approach will go as buckrake is new and wagon is an upgrade from my venerable 4500. Chop will be better no doubt so that will help hugely. 8 inches between forks..

Are you suggesting that i should only roll the sides? I assume so as i will be driving over the middle to get to the edges!

Should i ballast the tyres?

Tunes are definitely the order of the day.. whisky deffo not !! Cider? probably not!!

wagon loads likely to come in at 4 or 5 n hour so should be plenty of time..

starting next week..
5 loads a hour you need to get another machine on the clamp!!
Long low clamp reverse the wagon on it and drop the grass on top
Bonus heavy rolling and fork doesn't have to move it far
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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