How will the public respond to higher and higher food prices..

hoff135

Member
Location
scotland
...while British farms are being bought as fast as possible by investment bankers to plant trees. When God knows how many thousands of acres of crops are going in to biomass boilers.

I'm no expert on world grain markets but seems thats extreme weather is affecting supply along with soaring demand from China. A couple more droughts here and there and it could get even shorter.

What will people think when(not if) we see shortages pushing prices sky high while 10s of thousands of acres have been lost to rewilding and other so called eco projects?

Will they blame the government? Blame farmers? Blame livestock farmers for feeding grain to animals?
 

teslacoils

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Price of avocados doubles and they would give zero sh1!s. Why should bread going up 2p bother them?

A classic example of folk not liking something but having no solution. Perhaps the government might step in to directly subsidise grain? I think not.

Cigs, wine, fuel, houses go up every year. No reason for food to be the main brake on inflation.
 
It’s always the farmers fault.
Ripping out hedgerows and draining wet areas? Farmers fault (not Govt grants to do so)
BSE? - Farmers fault (not Govt for demanding animal products be put into animal feed during WW2 then not legislating to stop it again)
F&M? - fault of a guy in S Northumberland.
Pesticides killing bees? - Farmers fault (not Govt for allowing their use etc

And so it goes on- it will be farmers at fault for taking areas out of food production not Govts for incentivising it.
 

toquark

Member
Food riots are way off. Anyway, isn’t this what we’ve been complaining about for years? People not valuing their food and the price it costs to produce.

I’d like to think that the increasing cost of food will focus people’s minds on its production rather than indulging some ecologist’s wet dream.
 

Hindsight

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Well I have witnessed food price inflation today and the quick answer is you farmer commodity producers aren't getting much of it. I enjoy doing the family shop. I vary between multiple retailers. Today it was Morrisons. And two of my staple reference point items have moved. substantially in price. OK.

1 The savers basic oats (sorry guys I buy the cheapest not for me the fancy branded Scotts Porage Oats or Mornflake.) A few months ago they were 75pence per kg pack. And had been for years. They went to 85p a few months ago along with rebranding the packaging and removing' any reference to Savers (and note Morrisosn have pretty much ended that brand now from all categories. ). Today I paid 99pence per kg. So my cheap oats have increased to consumer 25% in less than a few months.

2 Kettle crisps. These retail at £2 packet. But periodically they are on offer at £1 packet, when like many others I buy loads to tide the family over until the next time on offer. OK today Kettle crisps are on offer - but at £1.15 per packet. I am just thinking that is the new 'on offer' price point. So a 15% price rise. Be interesting to see what price contract potatoes are for 2022.

I have a few more regular items that I follow - but I will not bore you further.
 

Hindsight

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Food riots are way off. Anyway, isn’t this what we’ve been complaining about for years? People not valuing their food and the price it costs to produce.

I’d like to think that the increasing cost of food will focus people’s minds on its production rather than indulging some ecologist’s wet dream.

You might like to think that, and by all means do, but doubt it will. What it will due is lead to general grumbles as the electorate starts to experience a substantial rise in cost of living. Government and BofE will keep saying it isa wone off adjustment as they desperately try to stop the public sector Unions seeking more money. Only public sector is now unionised effectively and can throw around the threat of strike action.
 

daveydiesel1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co antrim
Accordin to the wife (im never in the supermarket) the weekly shop has increased a lot since covid/brexit but the farmer is only gettin a bit more probably only enough to slightly offset the rising costs so if it does go up more wel only get a small share of it but i am a believer theres a famine comin in our generation between ground bein taken out of production, over reliance on brought in cargo thatl stop some day when some of the governments decide to fall out endin in trade deals bein stopped and population gradually going against farming for environmental/animal welfare reasons. But slap it up them when it happens as therl be no sympathy from me if there was empty shelves
 

hoff135

Member
Location
scotland
Food riots are way off. Anyway, isn’t this what we’ve been complaining about for years? People not valuing their food and the price it costs to produce.

I’d like to think that the increasing cost of food will focus people’s minds on its production rather than indulging some ecologist’s wet dream.
That's the thing though, will they see the problem with planting swathes of productive land in trees while food continues to rise?

To be clear I'm quite happy its going up, shame the rise has been nullified by input costs but is what it is
 
Well I have witnessed food price inflation today and the quick answer is you farmer commodity producers aren't getting much of it. I enjoy doing the family shop. I vary between multiple retailers. Today it was Morrisons. And two of my staple reference point items have moved. substantially in price. OK.

1 The savers basic oats (sorry guys I buy the cheapest not for me the fancy branded Scotts Porage Oats or Mornflake.) A few months ago they were 75pence per kg pack. And had been for years. They went to 85p a few months ago along with rebranding the packaging and removing' any reference to Savers (and note Morrisosn have pretty much ended that brand now from all categories. ). Today I paid 99pence per kg. So my cheap oats have increased to consumer 25% in less than a few months.

2 Kettle crisps. These retail at £2 packet. But periodically they are on offer at £1 packet, when like many others I buy loads to tide the family over until the next time on offer. OK today Kettle crisps are on offer - but at £1.15 per packet. I am just thinking that is the new 'on offer' price point. So a 15% price rise. Be interesting to see what price contract potatoes are for 2022.

I have a few more regular items that I follow - but I will not bore you further.
£1.59 for a kilo of organic porridge oats in Aldi, which I think is better value than 99p for savers Oats.
 

Hindsight

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
£1.59 for a kilo of organic porridge oats in Aldi, which I think is better value than 99p for savers Oats.

Hi, Nope farmer Bach., no way is that better value Oats is Oats for my porridge. My basic arithmetic tells me one kilo of oats at 99 pence is cheaper than at 159 pence. I am not suckered in with any kind of organic branding. Morrisons do though have one trick up their sleeve. They place the cheapest oats on the lowest shelf - which entails getting down on my knees in the aisle to pick up a packet, or usually two while I am down there!! .
 

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