Kill Grass

colhonk

Member
Location
Darlington
Is there any spray to kill grass in spring sown wheat? Ryegrass mainly. Over the years have tried,,,Broadway star,Axial, Axial pro, all useless.
 

spin cycle

Member
Location
north norfolk
axial should do it :scratchhead: ....but there are other cheaper .....used to use something called cheetah in wheat IIRC.....but now theres a non selective called cheetah:scratchhead:
 

juke

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
DURHAM
Is there any spray to kill grass in spring sown wheat? Ryegrass mainly. Over the years have tried,,,Broadway star,Axial, Axial pro, all useless.
have you considered having the rye grass tested for resistance at all ?
 

colhonk

Member
Location
Darlington
It quite possibly is resistant as accidental extra dose does not even touch it :(, But what to do if it is? Glyphosate kills it but it just comes back next year.Although I have not ploughed this field since the last centuary I did plough it last year,and paid particular attention to do the job properly, but it seems to be back anyhow.:(
 

juke

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
DURHAM
It quite possibly is resistant as accidental extra dose does not even touch it :(, But what to do if it is? Glyphosate kills it but it just comes back next year.Although I have not ploughed this field since the last centuary I did plough it last year,and paid particular attention to do the job properly, but it seems to be back anyhow.:(
does it make it through a graminicide or through a kerb applicationwhen the land is in a break ? or is the field/fields in continous cereals ?
 

colhonk

Member
Location
Darlington
Kerb sort of gives it a fright when in OSR (y)
Avadex sort of sorts it but as I do not spread it myself, bits may not get spread properly.
 

juke

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
DURHAM
A resistance test sounds needed, however I think you already know the answer ,
Is there an a.d plant close by that could take it for rye ? Just thinking the height ofcereal rye might help block it out and you can still use some of the wheat pre ems could help still.

Just an idea
 
If axial is not killing it I would view it as a serious issue that you need to address via rotation really. Collect the seed and resistance test it.

Tickle and roll post harvest and wait for green up might help, I've never tried it though.

Until you know what works on it you are stumped. Are beet or spuds an option? Even maize? I know you are a bit far north.
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
A resistance test will save you a lot of wasted herbicides. ADAS is the first port of call. They will advise on how to take the samples. Test your water that you use for spraying if it's mains or bore water too. DeSangosse can help you with that.

I have a couple of ryegrass fields that stubbornly refused to clean up. Lots of dead plants but it germinates when it feels like and gets very waxy very quickly so needs decent adjuvants in the tank with contact herbicides. Spring cropping will help but you need to consider pre harvest desiccation to help kill what's there.
 
A resistance test will save you a lot of wasted herbicides. ADAS is the first port of call. They will advise on how to take the samples. Test your water that you use for spraying if it's mains or bore water too. DeSangosse can help you with that.

I have a couple of ryegrass fields that stubbornly refused to clean up. Lots of dead plants but it germinates when it feels like and gets very waxy very quickly so needs decent adjuvants in the tank with contact herbicides. Spring cropping will help but you need to consider pre harvest desiccation to help kill what's there.
Do you feel your claydon approach has altered your ryegrass position at all?
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Do you feel your claydon approach has altered your ryegrass position at all?
The drill is useless for weed control. Pre drilling cultivations are only by choice and the drill disturbs soil, breaking dormancy of weeds (not just ryegrass). What is getting weeds under control is the system - specifically more spring crops. I was using pre drilling glyphosate before, even pre ploughing in spring, so little change there.
 

colhonk

Member
Location
Darlington
Beet, Pototoes ect not an option up here.All these other specialist spring crops not either aas too far north. May be able to Spring crop maybe once in 10 years, Like this year,and look whats happened, grass weed growing but not the sown wheat as no real rain since early march. Have asked on the Weaving gd thread if using such a drill with minimal distubance would help alot.
 

holmes65

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
S Yorkshire
We have found spring cropping to have the biggest impact on ryegrass populations, gave up spring grass herbicides 3 years ago, as they are a waste of money and do more harm than good on our system. We now have a spring break one year in six. Any bad feilds we grew spring barley for one or two years as the crop outcompetes the ryegrass, also in a mild spring the ryegrass may not vernalise so there is no seed return. Currently growing 20 Ha per year of AD winter rye as it is very competative and the crop is taken off before the majority of seed has shed.
We found the only way to beat ryegrass is to change the system as the solution will not come out of a can. We also spend many happy hours with a knapsack sprayer, or hand roqueing later in order to prevent seed return. In the worst areas sacrificing the crop and spraying off the lot is the best solution long term, we have sprayed headlands off and you can see to the line the difference the following year.Three years ago we sprayed off 5Ha This year none, it can be done ,but its not easy.
Cultivations are mainly min till, opportunistic direct drilling and even resort to ploughing bad ryegrass fields,but need to plough to a high standard or not worth the diesel.
 

Could a ‘Meat Tax’ be on the cards in the UK?

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Written by Richard Halleron from Agriland

The latest machination coming from the so-called ‘opinion formers’, who seem to have the ear of government advisors in London, is the introduction of a ‘Meat Tax’ at consumer level.

This approach, it is argued, would have the combined impact of reducing meat consumption levels (I can really see the health benefits coming through now), while also helping to reduce the overall carbon footprint of production agriculture.

What absolute drivel! In my opinion, none of this makes sense at any level. This is a scurrilous and unfounded attack on livestock farming in this part of the world.

Yet, it has to be taken seriously. I make this point because economists at Rothamsted Research have already crunched the numbers where the introduction of a ‘UK...
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