Pedigree Lleyns?

fifteenfarming

Member
Livestock Farmer
Hello,

I’ve just joined the site a few moments ago after lurking for quite a few months.

Bit of info: I’m a teenager living on a farm in Sussex. I’m very keen on sheep and am looking to do more with them in the future. We currently have a flock of Texel x Romany.

For a long time now I’ve been very interested in the Lleyn breed and they appear to be quite popular. I’ve heard that they’re easy lambers, good mothers and often produce triplets. Is this true? Would they be an ideal breed or are there better ones out there?

We have about 14 acres of grazing land which isn’t a huge amount so was also wondering about keeping a pedigree flock. From what I’ve read you can make quite a profit out of the pedigrees. Does anyone have experience with keeping and selling them?

Thank you for reading and look forward to hearing from people, if there are any questions please ask.

S
 

firther

Member
Location
holmfirth
i were talking to someone other day who swapped from texels to lleyn's and he said it were best thing they'd ever done. less problems etc. There also butchers so they must be happy with them. Personally i run texels and texel x's so don't shoot the messenger :ROFLMAO:
 

Jerry

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Devon
I run a flock of pure, not pedigree, Lleyn. Only 220 ewes but it’s part of a mixed farm setup.

As a ewe I find them very capable and suit my system of lambing outside in Feb/March.

Good mums, milky, sensible size.

I breed 75% to commercial tups, in my case Charolaise. Rest go to very good Lleyn rams fir replacement ewe lambs and rams that I sell as shearlings.

The char cross produces a very good prime lamb that lambs easily with very good lamb vigour at birth. They can be shirt in birth coat but I’m on free draining soil and close to the coast so can’t say it’s a problem for me.

Get it right you end up with lambs like this.


C08849D2-7C92-42F6-83C8-61EA175AF157.jpeg


Selling live here you get a premium for tight skinned meaty lambs with butchers buying them.

if you cross to a Texal you would possibly add value to the ewe lambs as they make a nice ewe. But I like my chars.

I sell pure rams. These are all sired by high index rams. I’m looking for shape and power in the sires to produce good ewes and rams that are fit for purpose. Getting return customers so must be doing the job.

252EAB0D-9EF5-4429-B105-129855F763C3.jpeg
90D677F2-0A02-4AAE-9533-EF23602B3034.jpeg


Downside of the ewes is they can be prone to mastitis as they are very milky.

Feet are good, temperament is ok.

I know little about the pedigree side if things. I would speak to the society to see if they have info of use. It has to be said there is as much variation in the breed as there are between breeds.

I don’t like the leggy large ewes. Prefer the more stocky types.
 

Dry Rot

Member
Livestock Farmer
Buy off a good commercial flock with a track record and you will not go far wrong. I'd forget about pedigrees personally - and showing. They have become a popular sheep and popularity means that anything with the name will sell. They are reasonably hardy but bear in mind where they come from. They are not hill sheep and should be able to rear multiples which means your flock can grow quickly.
 

scottish-lleyn

Member
Mixed Farmer
We run 1900 lleyn type ewes here. Not registered anymore. The pedigree lleyn job is a funny one not in the same league as the terminals but catching up with bigger heavier rams being the in thing atm and the more traditional types not so in demand. If its just a small flock for a bit of fun go for some of the top showing people and work from there. If you want a funtional sheep that does what a sheep should then seek one of the many society member who are lambing outside and recording a few i can think of are incheoch, ian and tom walling at farmstock genetics,jon blakey, of the top of my head. Or it you want unregistered perigrine obrey or myself(shamless plug) mine are abit heinz 57 these day but predominantly lleyn breeding and all recorded and doing there job here.
 

Jerry

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Devon
We run 1900 lleyn type ewes here. Not registered anymore. The pedigree lleyn job is a funny one not in the same league as the terminals but catching up with bigger heavier rams being the in thing atm and the more traditional types not so in demand. If its just a small flock for a bit of fun go for some of the top showing people and work from there. If you want a funtional sheep that does what a sheep should then seek one of the many society member who are lambing outside and recording a few i can think of are incheoch, ian and tom walling at farmstock genetics,jon blakey, of the top of my head. Or it you want unregistered perigrine obrey or myself(shamless plug) mine are abit heinz 57 these day but predominantly lleyn breeding and all recorded and doing there job here.

I source my stock rams from Peregrine. Very good set up.
 

primmiemoo

Member
Location
Devon
It's a funny old year, with postponements and cancellations of shows and trade events, but if it does go ahead in October, I'd recommend a visit to the National Sheep Association Event at Three County's Showground.

Have a good look at the Lleyn Soc stand, and have a chat with them. Keeping true to the traditional, small-medium, milky, maternal pattern of Llyn should enable you to utilise your acreage, and sell useful female lines, either as ewes or maternal line rams.
If they are there, have a chat with the breeders named above, too.
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
If pedigree is something that interests you, then give it a crack... but it should be mentioned @Jerry @scottish-lleyn and myself are not pedigree breeders and we concentre purely on commercial traits. Traits which are maybe not always desirable within the "pedigree society show and sale" worlds. Our views may be slightly skewed in that regard as its more about function than form...

I'm running 500 pure(ish) Lleyns - half bred to the Lleyn the other half to Texel.
Only thing I will say is keep away from the tall, slight/light bodied and long legged types. They are poor sheep.

As has been said, this is maybe going to be a difficult year to get started, but I hope for all that the breeding sales do go ahead as close to normal as possible.

Don't know your location, but check the Lleyn Society website (which I'm sure you will have already) and suss out your nearest sale. Even if you don't buy, go for a look and talk to some sellers - learn what you're looking at. Get a taste for the type you like and watch the trade.

They are reasonably hardy but bear in mind where they come from. They are not hill sheep and should be able to rear multiples which means your flock can grow quickly.


They are more than just reasonably hardy.
FB_IMG_1525033571651.jpg

And with the right breeding, they cope on hill which upto I switched was Cheviot and Blackie ground...
 

AftonShepherd

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
East Ayrshire
...
Only thing I will say is keep away from the tall, slight/light bodied and long legged types. They are poor sheep.
...
Absolutely. I inherited some in a farm reshuffle and the more I work with them the more I'm convinced that they're white hornless Swales. They may have their place but it's not here for!
 

spark_28

Member
Location
Western isles
If pedigree is something that interests you, then give it a crack... but it should be mentioned @Jerry @scottish-lleyn and myself are not pedigree breeders and we concentre purely on commercial traits. Traits which are maybe not always desirable within the "pedigree society show and sale" worlds. Our views may be slightly skewed in that regard as its more about function than form...

I'm running 500 pure(ish) Lleyns - half bred to the Lleyn the other half to Texel.
Only thing I will say is keep away from the tall, slight/light bodied and long legged types. They are poor sheep.

As has been said, this is maybe going to be a difficult year to get started, but I hope for all that the breeding sales do go ahead as close to normal as possible.

Don't know your location, but check the Lleyn Society website (which I'm sure you will have already) and suss out your nearest sale. Even if you don't buy, go for a look and talk to some sellers - learn what you're looking at. Get a taste for the type you like and watch the trade.




They are more than just reasonably hardy.
View attachment 874692
And with the right breeding, they cope on hill which upto I switched was Cheviot and Blackie ground...

thats the kind of ground i want mine running on, where can i get a tup that suits that in scotland?
 

Nithsdale Farmer

Member
Livestock Farmer
thats the kind of ground i want mine running on, where can i get a tup that suits that in scotland?


Sadly my "go to" breeder, who's tups have left the biggest mark on my flock sold his last, last year.

I can't comment on the new tups I bought yet, as the first lambs are only 6wks old. But no noticeable problems to flag up so far.



Best thing to do might be to find a tup which is leaving the stock you want... Breed him throughout your flock, don't worry about inbreeding - just cull hard anything which you don't like. Retain sons from him, too
 
others have said the majority - were a very small flock of mostly pedigree or pure. some of the registered flocks have got very good at hiding flaws - weve had some disaterous buy ins however if you shop right some beats can be had - we culled hard a few years ago but had to open the flock to get new blood in - this years are some stonking lambs so our tup from macaroni farms has shown his worth.
i agree that the show types are getting too large and too wrong in the frame for my liking.
 

Agrivator

Member
Hello,

I’ve just joined the site a few moments ago after lurking for quite a few months.

Bit of info: I’m a teenager living on a farm in Sussex. I’m very keen on sheep and am looking to do more with them in the future. We currently have a flock of Texel x Romany.

For a long time now I’ve been very interested in the Lleyn breed and they appear to be quite popular. I’ve heard that they’re easy lambers, good mothers and often produce triplets. Is this true? Would they be an ideal breed or are there better ones out there?

We have about 14 acres of grazing land which isn’t a huge amount so was also wondering about keeping a pedigree flock. From what I’ve read you can make quite a profit out of the pedigrees. Does anyone have experience with keeping and selling them?

Thank you for reading and look forward to hearing from people, if there are any questions please ask.

S

The Lleyn is vastly overrated, and many of them have been so poor in confirmation that the have had Texel and Cheviot added. The downside of that is that they will not breed to type.

Like many hybrids, they will produce a reasonably good lamb when crossed, but it is worth noting that a Texel lamb out of a Herdwick ewe will be at least as good.

If you are not in a sheep area, and if Lleyns are not a popular type of sheep, and if there are no hobby farmers to buy them, keeping Lleyns as pedigree sheep will be a bit of a disapointmnet.

Go for something that will sell in local markets - see what any local but often reticent sheep farmers are keeping. But if you really want to go it alone, what about Lincoln or Leicester Longwools, or even Herdwicks and/or Texels - something respectable.
 

irish dom

Member
The Lleyn is vastly overrated, and many of them have been so poor in confirmation that the have had Texel and Cheviot added. The downside of that is that they will not breed to type.

Like many hybrids, they will produce a reasonably good lamb when crossed, but it is worth noting that a Texel lamb out of a Herdwick ewe will be at least as good.

If you are not in a sheep area, and if Lleyns are not a popular type of sheep, and if there are no hobby farmers to buy them, keeping Lleyns as pedigree sheep will be a bit of a disapointmnet.

Go for something that will sell in local markets - see what any local but often reticent sheep farmers are keeping. But if you really want to go it alone, what about Lincoln or Leicester Longwools, or even Herdwicks and/or Texels - something respectable.
Suppose he should just admit defeat and buy the dearest prettiest mules he can find. That will guarantee disappointment when he's watching their teeth fall out and their bags scraping along the ground. Go for the lleyns they are the way forward but follow the commercially minded breeders and have yourself a nice easy fed productive flock. Don't listen to the old experts. They have had their day.
 

DrDunc

Member
Location
Dunsyre
The Lleyn is vastly overrated, and many of them have been so poor in confirmation that the have had Texel and Cheviot added. The downside of that is that they will not breed to type.

Like many hybrids, they will produce a reasonably good lamb when crossed, but it is worth noting that a Texel lamb out of a Herdwick ewe will be at least as good.

If you are not in a sheep area, and if Lleyns are not a popular type of sheep, and if there are no hobby farmers to buy them, keeping Lleyns as pedigree sheep will be a bit of a disapointmnet.

Go for something that will sell in local markets - see what any local but often reticent sheep farmers are keeping. But if you really want to go it alone, what about Lincoln or Leicester Longwools, or even Herdwicks and/or Texels - something respectable.
Overrated?

Aye indeed

I've 600 lleyns outside lambing

Been a good spring. Had to pull just over a dozen hung singles, been inside 3 ewes with a guddle of legs and heads, twinned on about half a dozen.

Had 2 bags of dead lambs, and 2 dead ewes, one of which was rotten lambs

One ewe has had mastitis this year so far. I bought a tup years ago that bred ewes which were bad for it. Tup got culled, along with all his offspring.



The policy here for years has been to notch the ear for culling of anything that gives trouble, and cull their offspring.

Vast majority not kept for breeding are finished off grass or forage rape/kale hybrid. Tried suftex terminal sire last year. They did finish a little earlier and I'm repeating the experiment this year, but it's not a huge step change improvement.

There are many types of lleyns, with many outcrosses still being sold as pure. Listen to the advice already posted here if you want good commercial ewes that look after themselves and their young.
 

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