Small Ragwort

Pasty

Member
Location
Devon
I've just noticed some small plants, about primrose size that look like ragwort in a wooded part of the farm near a stream. Not the tall stemmy jobs you would expect but fully in flower. Is there a kind of junior version? I'll keep an eye on it over the year. So far off limits from animals.
 

Davey

Member
Location
Derbyshire
I've just noticed some small plants, about primrose size that look like ragwort in a wooded part of the farm near a stream. Not the tall stemmy jobs you would expect but fully in flower. Is there a kind of junior version? I'll keep an eye on it over the year. So far off limits from animals.

Yes you get the bud and then the full flower, don't watch it just pull it up!
 

Davey

Member
Location
Derbyshire
This is basically what it will look like before you get the full stem and flower, as said seems a bit early though?



1616427613757.png
 

Pasty

Member
Location
Devon
Looks like Celandine.
It does. Thanks.
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Midlands
There are several types of ragwort, all quite different in how & where they grow. I had Marsh Ragwort growing along a winter borne the behaved differently from the Common Ragwort most see all too clearly.

Edit: I hadn't seen the photo as I was typing this. Sorry
 

Pasty

Member
Location
Devon
I think it's lesser Celandine. Still not good for animals. Came up as I am renting the field to a lady with a horse and she freaked out about Ragwort and I said it can't be. Seems all that family are not good for animals.
 
I think it's lesser Celandine. Still not good for animals. Came up as I am renting the field to a lady with a horse and she freaked out about Ragwort and I said it can't be. Seems all that family are not good for animals.

Not sure how much animals will eat this stuff, it grows close to the ground. I think docks and buttercup are technically toxic to stock but they never seem to bothered to eat them.

I guess Polo or 2,4D would curl it up.
 

Pasty

Member
Location
Devon
Not sure how much animals will eat this stuff, it grows close to the ground. I think docks and buttercup are technically toxic to stock but they never seem to bothered to eat them.

I guess Polo or 2,4D would curl it up.
Yeah it's only a dinky bit in the field at the mo. Most is behind the fence in the coppice. But you know what horse folk are like......
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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