Supersteer or not

Mhfarrier

Member
Livestock Farmer
What's the low down on a new holland supersteer?
Decent system or an added extra just waiting to break?
 

daveydiesel1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co antrim
Does nh still make it? Used to drive a tm135 speedsteer. As said above very sensitive on the road but u get used to it but very handy on headlands and tight gates. Never gave any trouble in around 7-8000 hours
 
If I remember correctly, there is the older Supersteer system posters are talking about, that pivots it's entire front axle to enhance the steering angles, and a newer system that instead automatically utilises the independent brakes to assist the tractor turning.
Which type is the OP asking about?
 

daveydiesel1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co antrim
If I remember correctly, there is the older Supersteer system posters are talking about, that pivots it's entire front axle to enhance the steering angles, and a newer system that instead automatically utilises the independent brakes to assist the tractor turning.
Which type is the OP asking about?
Not driven that newer type but surely side braking is really bad practise as its bad for the brakes and the diff.nh has enough brake problems without doin that. Local firm would be fond of sidebraking in tight gates and when hitchin up stuf or reversing and they had the diffs go on 2 tms, cant be coincidence as i never heard of any other tms blowin the diff
 

db9go

Member
Location
Buckinghamshire
Some people have never driven a tractor with out power steering just old fashion no power steering if you get on a tractor with out P A S you have to hold the steering different.
Its the same with super steer its different and you get used to it and you can drive just as straight
It came out in 1994
 

Mhfarrier

Member
Livestock Farmer
It's the one where the axle changes angle. Decide its not for me. I think it's just another thing to break and another thing that makes it less user friendly.
I need to get one that the ladies( wife and daughter) will drive in the yard so don't want anything unnecessary 🙄
 
Was told by a man that had one that you can't set a straight like across a field with it as it's too sensative, spud drills or the like.
sorry, but that is bull shît
I owned one for nearly 8000 hrs of contract planting work, including row crops of cotton, sorghum etc etc. Initially hand steering using marker arms & then auto steer for the last 2000 hours.
It could drive just as straight as any other tractor

the front axle didn’t swing out until the wheels had reached a certain angle. It certainly didn’t come into play if making small corrections to steering while planting or doing other field work, only when turning on the headlands
 
Not driven that newer type but surely side braking is really bad practise as its bad for the brakes and the diff.nh has enough brake problems without doin that. Local firm would be fond of sidebraking in tight gates and when hitchin up stuf or reversing and they had the diffs go on 2 tms, cant be coincidence as i never heard of any other tms blowin the diff
err, there would be thousands of JD & Case Magnums here with 1000’s of hours in them being used in the irrigated cotton industry especially, where turning brakes are used at every headland turn . . .

never heard of any issues, unless running spread duals ( rear duals 1 metre apart to fit down the rows ), which DID put a lot of stress on things
 

daveydiesel1

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Co antrim
err, there would be thousands of JD & Case Magnums here with 1000’s of hours in them being used in the irrigated cotton industry especially, where turning brakes are used at every headland turn . . .

never heard of any issues, unless running spread duals ( rear duals 1 metre apart to fit down the rows ), which DID put a lot of stress on things
Side brakes are fine if using them with rear mounted kit raised but not when haulin trailers
 

AHDB winding down horticulture and potatoes operations as Ministerial decision awaited

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AHDB has announced yesterday it is winding down significant activities on behalf of the horticulture and potatoes sectors.

While still awaiting a decision on the future by Ministers in England, Scotland and Wales, AHDB wants to reassure levy payers their views have been heard following recent ballots in the two sectors.

AHDB is now stopping programmes of work that could be restarted in the future by grower associations, individual growers or the supply chain. This work includes for example, export market access and promotional international trade event work, consumer marketing campaigns and market pricing and insight information. AHDB will continue to deliver limited emergency work on pests and diseases, including the Extension of Authorisation for Minor Use (EAMU)’s and some...
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