What moisture would you start at

farmerm

Member
Location
Shropshire
Am I going to need to invest in a drier this year :nailbiting: I don't normally start combining wheat until it tests below 15.5 but its now September and no sign of a long, hot, dry spell.
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
It was discussed.

We try to keep our charges as stable as possible year on year, to help reduce volatility for our members. Some years this means taking a hit, some years it means building a surplus.
Fair comment. A bigger store surplus means more projects/refurbs and/or a bigger rebate to members. I’ll bet that your drier fuel bill is a lot less than last year, so far.
 
I’ll bet that your drier fuel bill is a lot less than last year, so far.
Kerosene price much kinder, but still getting through a serious volume weekly when we use a thousand litres an hour at peak times.

Fair comment. A bigger store surplus means more projects/refurbs and/or a bigger rebate to members.
One of our upgrades is moving onto mains gas for drying, which will come online in May/June, paid for without going back to members for money.
 

MattR

Member
Seems odd to me that some people seem to have a blanket policy of "cut at xx %".
If a crop is just ripe and standing well, we're on top of things and there's a week's sunshine forecast, I might wait til it's under 16.
On the other hand if it's over ripe, losing quality, going flat, we're behind schedule and there's one good day before a week of rain, might go at 24 to get it in the shed before its all on the floor.
 

teslacoils

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
Seems odd to me that some people seem to have a blanket policy of "cut at xx %".
If a crop is just ripe and standing well, we're on top of things and there's a week's sunshine forecast, I might wait til it's under 16.
It's about maximising the output of expensive gear. Most long term stores with vented ducts and stirrers can take it at 20 percent. Kits there, it's just some electric and gas, so may as well be cutting. Especially on land where timely working in the dry is important.
 
What is the price that kerosene would be switched off and gas used instead.... if you can permanently keep the option?
Unfortunately the burner nozzles and plumbing are different for gas.

Gas is a cleaner burning fuel, which will become more important in years to come.

We can get a very competitive price per KW/h for gas, as our peak time does not coincide with the peak demand for gas.

Moving to gas removes the logistical issues of checking fuel tank levels, ordering tankers, having tankers in the yard during intake etc and also removes the security risk of having up to nearly 50,000L of liquid fuel on site.
 

Lincsman

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
Unfortunately the burner nozzles and plumbing are different for gas.

Gas is a cleaner burning fuel, which will become more important in years to come.

We can get a very competitive price per KW/h for gas, as our peak time does not coincide with the peak demand for gas.

Moving to gas removes the logistical issues of checking fuel tank levels, ordering tankers, having tankers in the yard during intake etc and also removes the security risk of having up to nearly 50,000L of liquid fuel on site.
I dont know your set up of course, but I would hedge my bets and have both, kero could well get cheaper if demand for oil keeps dropping, and your gas supply could fail at a bad time (careless digger driver!) along with not so easy to "shop around"
 

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