Early yields from Eastern Europe

Doesn’t look to good. Hopefully it’ll carry on and hold prices where they are. Add in the below average USDA predictions and we might just see group 1 at £250 because it’s over £200 for Nov already.
 

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B'o'B

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Rutland
Okay, the trade must be wrong.
its like ”the Trade“ telling us in November that U.K. wheat crop will yield 17million tonnes. They haven’t really got a clue, and they will adjust their estimate accordingly to growing conditions over the next 10 months for both the Oz and Argentinian wheat crops.

We are 4-6 weeks from harvest and I still haven’t got a very accurate estimate of what my fields will actually yield, nor have any of people from “the trade“ who have walked my fields in the last week. And I did ask them directly as they were standing in the fields.
 
ausi wheat will not usually get to the uk plenty of markets on their side of the world
hopefully the farmers over there get a descent crop for their survival
we in the uk have to grow wheat of a quality we can market into the market this side of the world

a big heap of hard feed wheat has to compete with maize from next year which will be at a discount to any other wheat produced any where else
feed wheat should be down graded class 1 2 or3 because of weather
when weather plays ball at harvest we can supply all the uks wheat requirements provide we plant the right variety
this year class 3 wheat will have a healthy premium
 

Clive

Staff Member
NFFN Member
Location
Lichfield
its like ”the Trade“ telling us in November that U.K. wheat crop will yield 17million tonnes. They haven’t really got a clue, and they will adjust their estimate accordingly to growing conditions over the next 10 months for both the Oz and Argentinian wheat crops.

We are 4-6 weeks from harvest and I still haven’t got a very accurate estimate of what my fields will actually yield, nor have any of people from “the trade“ who have walked my fields in the last week. And I did ask them directly as they were standing in the fields.

remove the 1 from 17 and you might be closer this year
 

Brisel

Member
NFFN Member
Location
Midlands
ausi wheat will not usually get to the uk plenty of markets on their side of the world
hopefully the farmers over there get a descent crop for their survival
we in the uk have to grow wheat of a quality we can market into the market this side of the world

a big heap of hard feed wheat has to compete with maize from next year which will be at a discount to any other wheat produced any where else
feed wheat should be down graded class 1 2 or3 because of weather
when weather plays ball at harvest we can supply all the uks wheat requirements provide we plant the right variety
this year class 3 wheat will have a healthy premium

Australian wheat can displace U.K. Wheat indirectly. Another 5 million tonnes of APW high protein milling wheat on the market needs to find a home. You'd think that our lower quality grain would be competing with feeds.

The UKS market is an interesting one - we used to have a big export market for Group 3 when varieties like Oakley, Robigus, Claire and Consort dominated the Recommended List. Elicit and Firefly might help rebuild that a bit but you need a lot of premium to cover the yield penalty of Gp 3s.
 

Jo28

Member
Location
East Yorks
Australian wheat can displace U.K. Wheat indirectly. Another 5 million tonnes of APW high protein milling wheat on the market needs to find a home. You'd think that our lower quality grain would be competing with feeds.

The UKS market is an interesting one - we used to have a big export market for Group 3 when varieties like Oakley, Robigus, Claire and Consort dominated the Recommended List. Elicit and Firefly might help rebuild that a bit but you need a lot of premium to cover the yield penalty of Gp 3s.
We stopped growing group 3 about 15 years ago as nearly always £3 or less premium which if you didn't quite meet spec could be deducted below feed price. Bet it hasn't changed!!
 

T Hectares

Member
Location
Berkshire
‘17 & ‘18 saw £10/t premiums, last year dropped away to £3/t but early sales were @ £10/t
Sold some for the next two years with £10/t min premiums.

Yields have been pretty solid here from Gp3’s but yes, needs £5/t premium minimum really
 
Australian wheat can displace U.K. Wheat indirectly. Another 5 million tonnes of APW high protein milling wheat on the market needs to find a home. You'd think that our lower quality grain would be competing with feeds.

The UKS market is an interesting one - we used to have a big export market for Group 3 when varieties like Oakley, Robigus, Claire and Consort dominated the Recommended List. Elicit and Firefly might help rebuild that a bit but you need a lot of premium to cover the yield penalty of Gp 3s.

is there that much yield loss in practice my premium for gp3 was last year was £6 for soft wheat And for this year it will be more not enough soft wheat in the ground


I recon we’ve exported more wheat to aus than they have landed in uk
we are more likely to buy cheaper wheat than they sell
most of our Wheat imports are German canadien Bread wheat or pasta wheat

this year we will likely need some feed wheat grade for cerestar unless they start using maize

the biggest problem we may have is low spec weight and micro toxins
 

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HSENI names new farm safety champions

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

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The Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) alongside the Farm Safety Partnership (FSP), has named new farm safety champions and commended the outstanding work on farm safety that has been carried out in the farming community in the last 20 years.

Two of these champions are Malcom Downey, retired principal inspector for the Agri/Food team in HSENI and Harry Sinclair, current chair of the Farm Safety Partnership and former president of the Ulster Farmers’ Union (UFU).

Improving farm safety is the key aim of HSENI’s and the FSP’s work and...
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