Fight fire with fire ?

Wouldn't bother mate. It's sh*t over here. Haven't you been taking in any of the stuff you read on here? :rolleyes:


;)
Things could be worse surely? Have you experience of the alternatives? @Farmer Roy wouldn’t be needing his moisture probe for a start, and he wouldn’t have to shake the deadly creepy crawlies out of his boots first thing in a morning. (y)
yeah, things do look sh!t over there, especially from the pages of TFF

but if ive learnt anything, I know things could always be a lot worse & there are always options.

as an outsider looking in, I can see & appreciate that there are people struggling & fearful of the future

but, I can also see opportunities & advantages for UK ag into the future
it still rains & you have a large domestic consumer base on your door step - 2 advantages we are missing out on
 

Muddyroads

Member
Location
Devon
My step daughter forwarded this to me this morning after having it sent to her. Surely it wouldn’t be too difficult to modify and repost it, substituting the word “meat” for “soya” would it?
B08CBBE6-24B0-412E-8987-AF7ECF3FF9D6.png
 
My step daughter forwarded this to me this morning after having it sent to her. Surely it wouldn’t be too difficult to modify and repost it, substituting the word “meat” for “soya” would it?View attachment 829498
And the point is? If the Amazon is burning point the finger at who is actually responsible, the people, the companies, the government. Odds are it's for palm oil? Then protest at who ever procures the oil for use in their products. Lastly put the blame at the organisation that implemented that palm oil was a good idea economically with no regard to its environmental implications, the UN by any chance?
So what has meat got to do with it,eh? :rolleyes:
 

glasshouse

Member
Location
lothians
And the point is? If the Amazon is burning point the finger at who is actually responsible, the people, the companies, the government. Odds are it's for palm oil? Then protest at who ever procures the oil for use in their products. Lastly put the blame at the organisation that implemented that palm oil was a good idea economically with no regard to its environmental implications, the UN by any chance?
So what has meat got to do with it,eh? :rolleyes:
Someone should post a pic of the amazon burning with the caption
"Remember where your soya milk comes from"
 

bovrill

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
East Essexshire
Of course any fire in the Amazon is a bad thing, but it might be worth pointing out that last year had an exceptionally low area burnt, and if you notice, all the current comparisons are with last year, not with the previous ones, against which this current situation seems much more normal.
 

Pond digger

Never Forgotten
Honorary Member
Location
East Yorkshire
and the article to back it up

Are you really a vegan? Farmer Matthew Evans says 'not possible'
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For every 75 hectares of peas, 1,500 animals die each year, including possums, wallabies, ducks and deer, not to mention rodents, writes Matthew Evans.

By Ian Horswill
Posted on July 9, 2019

Being vegan means you think that animals are not killed in the production of what you eat.
However Matthew Evans, a former food critic who now calls himself a gourmet farmer and restauranteur, says that notion is simply untrue.
In his new book, On Eating Meat: The Truth About Its Production And The Ethics Of Eating It, Evans writes the uncomfortable truth that animals die regardless of whether we choose to eat meat or not.
“It’s quite possible that eating less meat might mean less suffering. But don’t be fooled into thinking that being vegan hurts no animal,” Evans writes.
“When you eat, you’re never truly vegan. When humans grow and process food, any food, other things die.”
He says about 40,000 ducks are killed each year to protect rice production in Australia; that a billion mice are poisoned every year to protect wheat in Western Australia alone, and apple growers can kill up to 120 possums a year to protect their orchards.
“So a duck dying to protect a rice paddy for me is not much different to a cow dying to produce a steak,” Evans told ABC News.
Evans writes about a pea farm in Tasmania that produces 400 tonnes of peas and kills thousands of animals in the process. For every 75 hectares of peas, 1,500 animals die each year, including possums, wallabies, ducks and deer, not to mention rodents.
Plant-based meat, such as Beyond Meat's burgers comes at a cost to animals, argues Matthew Evans's burgers comes at a cost to animals, argues Matthew Evans

There are 22 ingredients in a Beyond Meat patty.
“The owners assure me it wouldn’t be financially viable for them to grow peas without killing animals. Which means that every time we eat peas, farmers have controlled the “pest” species on our behalf, and animals have died in our name,” Evans writes.
This process is replicated at farm after farm all around the country.
“They are both animal deaths that happen in the name of us being able to eat,” he said.
“So there is nothing that we can do that doesn’t have an impact on animals.”
Evans estimates he kills close to 5,000 moths, slugs and snails each year in order to grow vegetables at Fat Pig Farm, his property in Tasmania.
A scientific analysis from the University of NSW used by Evans concludes that “25 times more sentient beings die to produce a kilo of protein from wheat than a kilo of protein from beef”.
Evans stressed he was making the point so that vegans are aware of the impact of their choices.

“If you want truly vegan agriculture, you’re going to have more fossil fuel emissions and in the process end up with more expensive food, poorer pollination and reduced variety thanks to the removal of domesticated bees,” Evans writes.
Vegan Australia spokesman Andy Faulkner told ABC News that he “fully concedes that” animals die in the production of crops.
He said it was all about scale: rearing animals requires all the impact of growing crops to feed them, with the added impact of then killing the animal for meat as well.
“We have a situation where it’s either minimising harm … or the next option is maximising harm,” he said.
“Vegans are aware of this. It’s about minimising impact.”
Hell, if all the vegans read this they’re going to be jumping of a cliff! Err........ problem solved.

Can’t believe I said that!:rolleyes:
 
fudge me, there's not much fight left in you sad pansies is there, this thread has died & TFF has reverted back to prices too low / inputs too high / Brexit / which tractor / pickup / combine / barley variety . . . etc etc
 

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