How Can Pork Or Chicken Pay When It's Almost Free At The Shop?

teslacoils

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
....when I can buy a joint of British pork shoulder in Morrisons today for £2 a kilo?

Or a whole UK chicken (1.7kg) for £2.99

Who is "paying" for this?

It's time there were some price controls on supermarkets.
 
Location
Devon
....when I can buy a joint of British pork shoulder in Morrisons today for £2 a kilo?

Or a whole UK chicken (1.7kg) for £2.99

Who is "paying" for this?

It's time there were some price controls on supermarkets.

Vertical integration innit.

There is no 'market' value so the price is controlled by the supermarkets.

There is nothing being done to stop it, but there is a huge push [via Red Tractor] to make beef and lamb the same.
I'm sure a farming 'union' would prevent this........
 

bitwrx

Member
....when I can buy a joint of British pork shoulder in Morrisons today for £2 a kilo?

Or a whole UK chicken (1.7kg) for £2.99

Who is "paying" for this?

It's time there were some price controls on supermarkets.
Morrisons are paying at the moment. They are 'helping' the industry clear it's backlog by giving away what we produce. Price at the farm gate on the open market is approx £1.40/kg dwt. Pork is a loss leader for them at the mo.

Our bloody fault for producing so much though really. And for being so willing to put up with the poor returns.
 
Location
Devon
Morrisons are paying at the moment. They are 'helping' the industry clear it's backlog by giving away what we produce. Price at the farm gate on the open market is approx £1.40/kg dwt. Pork is a loss leader for them at the mo.

Our bloody fault for producing so much though really. And for being so willing to put up with the poor returns.

Who financed / encouraged all the production?
 

lloyd

Member
Location
Herefordshire
....when I can buy a joint of British pork shoulder in Morrisons today for £2 a kilo?

Or a whole UK chicken (1.7kg) for £2.99

Who is "paying" for this?

It's time there were some price controls on supermarkets.
Intensive soya fed broiler chicken is fast production .
These state of the art modern sheds are pushing out 7.5 crops
a year (so I've been told by my mate with new sheds).
The volume of meat they produce in such a short time
is unbelievable, that's why it can be sold cheap by the supermarkets.
 

teslacoils

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
I've got a spring osr calculator. Get be me the money you would spend on growing it. I'll give you it back, less ten percent, in October. Still better than sosr.

Fillet steak £29.50/kg. Cut thin so it will cook like sh!t.

Chicken thighs £1.99/kg. Bone them, quarter them, batter and fry. Fantastic.

Pork loin chops £4.50/kg. Rub in flour, egg, breadcrumb. Four mins in the frier. Ace.

Pic is of a nice pork tonkatsu i made. Can't go wrong. Currently busy freezing home made chicken stock.
 

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digger64

Member
Morrisons are paying at the moment. They are 'helping' the industry clear it's backlog by giving away what we produce. Price at the farm gate on the open market is approx £1.40/kg dwt. Pork is a loss leader for them at the mo.

Our bloody fault for producing so much though really. And for being so willing to put up with the poor returns.
Isnt it to do with brexit/covid and uk processing capacity (or lack of ) ?
 

holwellcourtfarm

Member
Livestock Farmer
Morrisons are paying at the moment. They are 'helping' the industry clear it's backlog by giving away what we produce. Price at the farm gate on the open market is approx £1.40/kg dwt. Pork is a loss leader for them at the mo.

Our bloody fault for producing so much though really. And for being so willing to put up with the poor returns.
Oh, and by 2030 please prove you're net zero carbon while you're at it.....
 

bitwrx

Member
Isnt it to do with brexit/covid and uk processing capacity (or lack of ) ?
Yes. Food service has shut down, christmas didn't happen etc. This all softens demand.
Processing capacity has been hit hard by covid in abattoir workforces, but that's getting better.
Covid in the abattoirs has also shut off exports to China. Covid is a notifiable disease. Chinese have fairly strict phytosanitary (or do I mean political?) requirements around notifiable diseases so some of the processors don't export there for the time being. This affects carcase balance, which depresses the overall price more.
Brexit affected the cull sow trade over the new year, but this wouldn't have been so bad if....
isn't it the chinese ban on german pork imports due to swine flu.. so to much in EU :scratchhead:

seem to 1000's pigs about...can't work out how they keep going :scratchhead:
As @spin cycle points out, African swine fever in German wild boar has shut off the Chinese export market to all German pork, so their freezers were already full.

It's hard to think of anything else that could've gone wrong at the same time to make it any worse TBH. Apart from the price of grain and protein crops going through the roof, that is. Oh wait, they already have.

My point still stands though. The only reason it's available so cheap is because we've produced too much. We weren't to know that 9 months ago when we served the buggers, but we sure as sh!t know it now. But that's business. If I wasn't up for that risk I would've stayed in my salary job.

Oh, and by 2030 please prove you're net zero carbon while you're at it.....
It's ok, by 2030 we'll all be living in mud huts. Or cob and thatch in my part of the world. Look forward to it. :ROFLMAO:
 

In conversation with a soil health pioneer

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In conversation with a soil health pioneer

Written by Janet Hughes



https://www.buzzsprout.com/1657363/8311877-janet-hughes-and-gabe-brown-the-six-principles-of-soil-health.mp3

In this month's Future Farming podcast, Janet Hughes talks to Gabe Brown.

Gabe has been named one of the twenty-five most influential agricultural leaders in the United States. He farms at...
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