Is this the wettest Autumn you have had to cope with?

silverfox

Member
Location
Shropshire
2012 was worse. It was wetter earlier as we were getting the combine stuck, then maize harvester got stuck. 2017 wasn’t great either. Think there was one decent week to get stuff drilled. It’s often much wetter over here in the west. I think the reason we are hearing so much about it this year, is because the south and east are also wet. They aren’t used to it !!
 

teslacoils

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Lincolnshire
It's not 2012 wet. But it's getting that way. 2012 was awful all year. This is just awful at a critical time. And as been said, it is "only just October" so it has time to get both better.....or worse.

We aren't used to this in the east. If this was more normal, we would be a pasture farm. Economically, one awful year in five is not really sustainable.
 
Location
sh!t creek
I don’t think this is the wettest (yet), 2012 around here seems to top the table - at the mo. The difference is that in 2012 we’d planted three times the acreage of osr, which looked well ( no csfb damage) we’d also got nearly all the winter barley, & approx. just under half the area of winter wheat in the ground. This year to date we have a vastly reduced area of osr ( which is been murdered by csfb, & zero cereals in the ground :cry:
 
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in rainfall in the gauge terms this summer since 1 june it is the wettest we have had since I started recording rainfall in 1992
no point in arguing over the odd inch on which is the wettest
because when it is this wet drilling any more need a long dry spell
half an inch a week in 8mm rains every 3 or 4 days will keep the seed in the bag all the autumn preem returned and the order for n fertiliser halved
 

Roy_H

Member
As above,thank goodness I am not farming anymore.
I feel for those that still are.I know some farmers whose seed drill hasn't been out of the shed yet. This morning it is absolutely pouring down yet again. It could be a record breaker yet. Who knows?
 
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Hindsight

Member
Location
Lincolnshire
I don’t think this is the wettest (yet), 2012 around here seems to top the table - at the mo. The difference is that in 2012 we’d planted three times the acreage of osr, which looked well ( no csfb damage) we’d also got nearly all the winter barley, & approx. just under half the area of winter wheat in the ground. This year to date we have a vastly reduced area of osr ( which is been murdered by csfb, & zero cereals in the ground :cry:

Your description is perfect. The lack of viable OSR is a key point at the moment. I consider quite a bit of the September sown OSR locally is debatable whether viable. August OSR growing well - an one just hopes does not suffer larvae damage in Spring.

And due to blackgrass cereals intentionally delayed where in 2012 autumn many of us were still in denial with blackgrass and thus more autumn cereals were established in September, before the fields became totally saturated.

Do always remember that Spring 2013 was the coldest since 1963. March was bitterly cold with significant snow in Lincolnshire. April not much better. But it was a very dry summer in 2013 with high sun levels in June and thus wheat yields were good.
 

curlietailz

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Sedgefield
We have 100 acre of OSR mid Sept drilled looking riddled with flea beetle. Had one spray but too wet to get on the land to spray again since
May still make a crop
Nowt else drilled
Got 100 acre Sumoed
And about 50 ploughed up
Rest in stubble still
High hopes we can drill something with the combi this week and we’ll plough a bit more if not.
not as disheartened as I was .... coz I’ve started a spring cropping contingency plan
 

nonemouse

Member
Location
North yorks
2000 was far worse, cattle sheds went under water twice in oct 2000, getting about on a par with 2012 but that year was wet all september, flooding mid september and then october dried up a bit
 

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Man fined £300 for bonfire-related waste offences

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Written by William Kellett from Agriland

court-640x360.jpg
A man has pleaded guilty at Newtownards Magistrates’ Court to waste offences relating to a bonfire next to the electrical sub-station on the Circular Road in Newtownards, Co. Down.

Gareth Gill (51) of Abbot’s Walk, Newtownards pleaded guilty to two charges under the Waste and Contaminated Land (Northern Ireland) Order 1997, for which he was fined £150 each and ordered to pay a £15 offender’s levy

On June 25, 2018, PSNI officers went to Gill’s yard, where they found a large amount of waste consisting of scrap wood, pallets, carpet and underlay.

Discussion with Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) officers confirmed the site...
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