Jaguar Land Rover all electric vehicles from 2025

toquark

Member
Drove a plug in hybrid Volvo last week for the first time. Loved it. Then it ran out of juice after 15 miles and switched to a petrol which was thirsty (35mpg) so not convinced its all that eco friendly.

It was lovely to drive on the battery though, very smooth and quiet.
 

Bald Rick

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Anglesey
Drove a plug in hybrid Volvo last week for the first time. Loved it. Then it ran out of juice after 15 miles and switched to a petrol which was thirsty (35mpg) so not convinced its all that eco friendly.

It was lovely to drive on the battery though, very smooth and quiet.
Yeah but no hybrids from JLR ..... going all out electric to "help our government meet net carbon zero by 2050"
 

toquark

Member
Yeah but no hybrids from JLR ..... going all out electric to "help our government meet net carbon zero by 2050"
To be honest, I was sceptical of the move towards electric vehicles until I drove it. It really was nice to be in and quick. The investment is going into electric so I guess we'll just have to get used to it. I'm a lot more relaxed about it since I've actually driven one.

The argument about how green they really are I think still has many holes in it. It certainly won't be any cheaper for the consumer that's for certain.
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
On news just now ...... JLR to stop making combustion engine vehicles and go all electric from 2025.

Thoughts?
That's if the company even survives that long. They can say anything, but doing is the important thing. They said there was a new Defender coming for fifteen years, but although they have launched a new vehicle with that name at last, it is not what anyone expected a 'Defender' to be, so really they still haven't.

I would love an electric vehicle with quiet high power. Especially one that can tow 3.5 tons for 300 miles or more between charges. My next car is very likely to be electric but unlikely to be a plug-in all-electric Land Rover.
 

Poorbuthappy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Devon
Drove a plug in hybrid Volvo last week for the first time. Loved it. Then it ran out of juice after 15 miles and switched to a petrol which was thirsty (35mpg) so not convinced its all that eco friendly.

It was lovely to drive on the battery though, very smooth and quiet.
The all electric xc40 looks good,but is serious ££. On a par with the ipace.
 

Davey

Member
Location
Derbyshire
It's a noble gesture but that's it, I'm sure long before then there will be a change in ownership and a quite scrapping of the statement.

I like the idea of going electric but towing and range mean that's not likely to happen anytime soon.

I do however think people need to be more honest with themselves about the apparent 'green ' credentials of electric cars

BTW if you aren't familiar with Mr Cadogan, probably best not watched with children in the room!

 

X344chap

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
Central Scotland
The infrastructure doesnt exist to charge all these vehicles and wont be in place in 2025. Also plenty of rural areas and long distances between towns even if they did have charging points - fine in the centre of London - but impractical in the country especially north of the border until you get batteries lasting longer than 300 plus miles and public charging points easily available. Where exactly do JLR think their market is now?
 

hoff135

Member
Location
scotland
That's if the company even survives that long. They can say anything, but doing is the important thing. They said there was a new Defender coming for fifteen years, but although they have launched a new vehicle with that name at last, it is not what anyone expected a 'Defender' to be, so really they still haven't.

I would love an electric vehicle with quiet high power. Especially one that can tow 3.5 tons for 300 miles or more between charges. My next car is very likely to be electric but unlikely to be a plug-in all-electric Land Rover.
You're in luck, new electric defender has already been built

Dv6w_zIYSN6yAIDRRqgQFQ.jpeg
 

Cowabunga

Member
Location
Ceredigion,Wales
It's a noble gesture but that's it, I'm sure long before then there will be a change in ownership and a quite scrapping of the statement.

I like the idea of going electric but towing and range mean that's not likely to happen anytime soon.

I do however think people need to be more honest with themselves about the apparent 'green ' credentials of electric cars

BTW if you aren't familiar with Mr Cadogan, probably best not watched with children in the room!

Remember that his opinion is from a perspective where Australian electricity is overwhelmingly generated from some of the dirtiest coal in the world. Take it with that and a pinch of salt.

Whatever, electric is the way it is going, like it or not. Hydrogen made from renewable or nuclear electricity may, or may not, eventually be a significant alternative.
 

Formatted

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Sussex
Where exactly do JLR think their market is now?
The FT article says they are hedging their bets on hydrogen fuel cell market rather than battery-electric. Burn hydrogen to generate electricity to drive electric motors. Rest of the market is doing traditional battery-electric cars
 

Davey

Member
Location
Derbyshire
Remember that his opinion is from a perspective where Australian electricity is overwhelmingly generated from some of the dirtiest coal in the world. Take it with that and a pinch of salt.

Whatever, electric is the way it is going, like it or not. Hydrogen made from renewable or nuclear electricity may, or may not, eventually be a significant alternative.
Absolutely but the point still exists that making 'stuff' especially cars and their batteries is far from a green process, even if you do charge it from sunbeams and fairy dust.

I should also say there was a correction posted regarding the recycling of aluminium if anyone is actually that interested?

 

Early moves to target wild oats

  • 543
  • 0
Growers and agronomists now face the dilemma of an early application to remove competition from emerged wild oats, or holding off to allow more weeds to germinate.

Syngenta grassweeds technical manager, Georgina Wood, urges Axial Pro treatment as soon as conditions allow, once weeds are actively growing.

“That offers the chance to control wild oats more cost effectively at lower rates, whilst there is still the flexibility to tailor application rates up to 0.82 l/ha for larger or over wintered weeds and difficult situations.

“The variability of crops and situations this season means decisions for appropriate Axial Pro rates and application techniques will need to be made on a field-by-field basis,” she advised.

1617958650096.png


Miss Wood urges...
Top