Older off road 4x4

Location
Fife
Another vote for 2x small chicken tractors, I'm also sceptical you'd get 350 chickens in a single caravan chassis unless it's a huge static caravan?

I'd seriously look at a tracked crawler type machine too.

Full disclosure: I have a 12x35 static that I've looked at turning into a chicken caravan and it would need at least a second axle plus big wide tyres on both to stop it tearing up the ground/getting stuck. Instead I'm probably going with a custom build using 2" scaffold tube similar (but better of course ;) ) to the one in the link below. Designing it for sub-200 hens to keep size manageable and going to use something like the wheels and axles in the amazon link. Will have guttering to collect rainwater to minimize running water out to them, insulated so can be used year round etc.


 

glensman

Member
Location
North Antrim
Hi, This is Mark J. Lemmon. I'm Experts to help you in the choice of your tractor Brands and all Things About tractor.


This is essentially what four-wheel drive does. It gives you traction where and when you need it. Although 4WD is a bit more complicated than that, it’s essentially a way to increase traction and power on the road.
Four wheel drive grippy grippy.
 

Highland Mule

Member
Livestock Farmer
Hi, This is Mark J. Lemmon. I'm Experts to help you in the choice of your tractor Brands and all Things About tractor.


This is essentially what four-wheel drive does. It gives you traction where and when you need it. Although 4WD is a bit more complicated than that, it’s essentially a way to increase traction and power on the road.
What do you recommend then Mark? There’s loads of people on this forum keen for you to share your expertise.
 
Having veered off on some thought provoking tangents I might just have stumbled across a partial solution called the Portable Winch (google it!). Basically a Honda engined portable capstan winch - which I have thought of a number of creative uses for.

It's mostly used in small scale logging and an interesting add on is a type of nose cone. So they put a cable choker around the log, then pass the cable through the nose cone. the front of the log sits inside the nose cone which deflects obstacles like other trees.

How is that any use?

I'm still solving the chassis issue. At the moment that being a single axle caravan chassis. I had been thinking of an equine solution, which would also fit in the overall value adding dimension I plan on (involves tourism). Researching logging horses I saw then use horse drawn log arches to haul logs. Then I saw one with a tow bar on it! Then I saw the price of horses o_O :ROFLMAO:

But what if, I could buy or have made a trailer dolly which would support the front of the chassis in transit. I could attach a cable to the hitch of the dolly and pass it through the nose cone, using the winch (rated for 1,000kg but will do multiples of that using mechanical advantage) for power. The nose cone will stop the hitch from digging in, and with some creative pulley use I can "steer" after a fashion.

There's reason behind this madness, one would need to walk my land to see it.

Some one in the past has spent a lot of time and effort with very little return.
Possibly, though I think there's a lot to be made here with the right ideas, giving me the ability to leave the place in significant better position and condition than I received it.

I would have stuck with the MF35, the zetor 4wd is a good option. I can't see a suv outpulling 2wd tractor without a lot of custom work.

I'd put it on skids, THREE short skids, two on the back half of the sides, and one in the middle front. You'll need some ground clearance for it to have any chance of surviving.

Other question: what are the chickens supposed to benefit from the rugged scenery? are they paying guests? or is this a fertilization scheme? I'm assuming you know you'll need to supply all of their calorie needs with grain, it might be easier to haul the grass to them.
I'm mostly leaving the vehicle options behind me now. One might slip, one might wreck the place, one might turn over and injure me, not great options.

Not sure the skids will work here, dual wheels with brakes is what I'll try first.

The hens provide a number of functions. Yes I'll have to feed them but eggs more than make up for that. I had thought of 4 advantages a few days ago so let's see how many come to mind right now. First is fertilisation through their own manure. Second is ran at the right time after livestock they pick through dung and eat fly larvae. Third, by doing the second they scratch dungs apart and become free manure spreaders. There is a fourth important role which I always forget, and I'll come back to it again.

Another vote for 2x small chicken tractors, I'm also sceptical you'd get 350 chickens in a single caravan chassis unless it's a huge static caravan?

I'd seriously look at a tracked crawler type machine too.

Full disclosure: I have a 12x35 static that I've looked at turning into a chicken caravan and it would need at least a second axle plus big wide tyres on both to stop it tearing up the ground/getting stuck. Instead I'm probably going with a custom build using 2" scaffold tube similar (but better of course ;) ) to the one in the link below. Designing it for sub-200 hens to keep size manageable and going to use something like the wheels and axles in the amazon link. Will have guttering to collect rainwater to minimize running water out to them, insulated so can be used year round etc.


Smaller is the idea now, 1/2 or 1/3rd size. 350 will fit, it's based on Richard Perkins Eggmobile. I don't have enough flat land on the entire farm to park that chicken caravan :ROFLMAO:
 

Poorbuthappy

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Devon
Think I would consider a 4 wheeled trailer in your scenario - as in a wheel in each corner and turntable/ dolly axle on the front. There's a few of these designs on YouTube, especially in USA. Could even be done with atv wheels.
That would work for equine power too.

2 smaller ones works in other ways too - daughter keeps hers on rotation- buying new pullets each autumn/late summer for alternate houses and so keeping the birds 2 years. (She's experimenting with keeping them longer still but thats another story)
She gets good lay rates through the winter with no lights that way too.
 
Think I would consider a 4 wheeled trailer in your scenario - as in a wheel in each corner and turntable/ dolly axle on the front. There's a few of these designs on YouTube, especially in USA. Could even be done with atv wheels.
That would work for equine power too.

2 smaller ones works in other ways too - daughter keeps hers on rotation- buying new pullets each autumn/late summer for alternate houses and so keeping the birds 2 years. (She's experimenting with keeping them longer still but thats another story)
She gets good lay rates through the winter with no lights that way too.
It's the cost of fabrication that would kill me changing the design tbh. I'm doing a lot at once atm, two new enterprises plus their infrastructure and facilities plus fencing. Though today I heard of someone who made the internal frame from metal resulting in a much lighter eggmobile which sounds very attractive.

Perkins puts the layers into the polytunnel for winter and buys in pol's each year to keep production going, the trick being the ones in the tunnel get processed into smoked chickens etc.
 

le bon paysan

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
Limousin, France
Sorry if I missed it, but would a 4x4 dumper be any good. Drop off the body, local garage fab and fit an old loader. tow smaller hen houses or make many very small hen boxes and move with loader.
 

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