Spraying silicone on crops

Bogweevil

Member
Cement is cheapest silicon fertiliser, it really is. Don't overdo it though or you will break your plough.

Seriously, soil is mostly silicon so it is odd to add more, though to be fair the foliar silicon products are more about hardening growth to resist pest/disease/stress.

Think the evidence is inconclusive.
 

jack6480

Member
Location
Staffs
Cement is cheapest silicon fertiliser, it really is. Don't overdo it though or you will break your plough.

Seriously, soil is mostly silicon so it is odd to add more, though to be fair the foliar silicon products are more about hardening growth to resist pest/disease/stress.

Think the evidence is inconclusive.
😂😂 love the last comment
 

Nitrams

Member
Location
Cornwall
Target is cell wall strength i believe. Hence stiffening growth and supposedly making plant cells less prone to attack from fungal hyphae.
Tend to agree with Brisel though
 

EddieB

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Staffs
As others have said, a highly abundant element within the soil. I tend to think it’s the latest must have gimmick.
 

Bogweevil

Member
Hydroponic growers and users of soil-free grow
I use sion on my strawbs, it may prevent truss kinking and mildew.
Coir grown crops perhaps?

Silicon most likely to be valuable in hydroponics or soil-less growing media - not essential though in most cases.
 

Bogweevil

Member
Here you go, AHDB 2016:

Silicon

There is some evidence that silicates and silicon can induce biostimulant responses, in
addition to pest and disease tolerance. Effects include alleviation of salt stress, adverse
climate conditions, drought stress and nutrient deficiency. A recent study found that seedpriming with Si resulted in maize plants that were more tolerant of alkaline stress (Latef &
Tran, 2016), and delay of plant senescence processes has also been demonstrated. Again,
the modes of action for these effects are poorly understood, with suggestions including
anatomical changes in plant tissues, enhancement of the antioxidant defence system in
plants, immobilisation of complex metals, or modulation of gene expression and signalling
via phytohormones (Savvas & Ntatsi, 2015).

A lot of research indicates that Si is linked to improved pest and disease tolerance of crops.
Wheat plants with applied Si had a greater resistance to green-aphids (Schizaphis graminum
(Rond.)). Si addition was also found to reduce powdery mildew severity in wheat (Guével et
al., 2007), with root applications being more effective than foliar applications, but this did not
translate to any improvement in plant growth. In addition, applications of Si resulted in
significant reductions in grazing of wheat plants by rabbits (Cotterill et al., 2007) and slug
feeding on wheat seedlings (Griffin et al., 2015). There is also evidence of mechanical
benefits: Si can accumulate in cell walls forming phytoliths and strengthen stems, resulting in
reduced lodging (Ma, 2004; Liang et al., 1994). Phytoliths are formed in cell walls when silica
is deposited into polymerised SiO2 (Savvas & Ntatsi, 2015). Hypothesised modes of action
include Si acting as a physical barrier, preventing penetration by pests and stimulation of
natural defence mechanisms (Pilon-Smits et al., 2009, Savvas and Ntatsi, 2015).

Barley and wheat are both thought to be accumulators of silicon with shoot dry weight
concentrations of 1.8% and 2.5% respectively (Guntzer et al., 2012). Whilst not an essential
nutrient, improved plant growth in the presence of Si has been demonstrated for a range of
plant species (Liang et al., 2007). Since most crop species can either accumulate or tolerate
increases in Si availability, it is potentially less risky to apply Si to crops than other beneficial
elements. There is limited evidence for Si interaction with OSR, with most literature reporting
on interactions with cereal crops. This area therefore warrants further investigation.

Silicon There is some evidence that silicates and silicon can induce biostimulant responses, in addition to pest and disease tolerance. Effects include alleviation of salt stress, adverse climate conditions, drought stress and nutrient deficiency. A recent study found that seed priming with Si resulted in maize plants that were more tolerant of alkaline stress (Latef & Tran, 2016), and delay of plant senescence processes has also been demonstrated. Again, the modes of action for these effects are poorly understood, with suggestions including anatomical changes in plant tissues, enhancement of the antioxidant defence system in plants, immobilisation of complex metals, or modulation of gene expression and signalling via phytohormones (Savvas & Ntatsi, 2015).

A lot of research indicates that Si is linked to improved pest and disease tolerance of crops. Wheat plants with applied Si had a greater resistance to green-aphids (Schizaphis graminum (Rond.)). Si addition was also found to reduce powdery mildew severity in wheat (Guével et al., 2007), with root applications being more effective than foliar applications, but this did not translate to any improvement in plant growth. In addition, applications of Si resulted in significant reductions in grazing of wheat plants by rabbits (Cotterill et al., 2007) and slug feeding on wheat seedlings (Griffin et al., 2015). There is also evidence of mechanical benefits: Si can accumulate in cell walls forming phytoliths and strengthen stems, resulting in reduced lodging (Ma, 2004; Liang et al., 1994). Phytoliths are formed in cell walls when silica is deposited into polymerised SiO2 (Savvas & Ntatsi, 2015).

Hypothesised modes of action include Si acting as a physical barrier, preventing penetration by pests and stimulation of natural defence mechanisms (Pilon-Smits et al., 2009, Savvas and Ntatsi, 2015). Barley and wheat are both thought to be accumulators of silicon with shoot dry weight concentrations of 1.8% and 2.5% respectively (Guntzer et al., 2012). Whilst not an essential nutrient, improved plant growth in the presence of Si has been demonstrated for a range of plant species (Liang et al., 2007). Since most crop species can either accumulate or tolerate 57 increases in Si availability, it is potentially less risky to apply Si to crops than other beneficial elements.

There is limited evidence for Si interaction with OSR, with most literature reporting on interactions with cereal crops. This area therefore warrants further investigation.
 

Get ready for pest monitoring, advises PGRO

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Written by Charlotte Cunningham

The Processors and Growers Research Organisation (PGRO) has issued new advice to help growers understand the importance of measuring pest populations before any decisions are made on insecticides. Charlotte Cunningham reports. Ahead of the trapping season, the PGRO has produced a new masterclass video to help growers understand how to trap and assess pest populations. The key advice is that using a range of preventative tools will be crucial for farmers looking to reduce cases of pea and bean weevil, pea moth, and silver Y moth this spring, while finding more sustainable ways of farming in line with new agricultural policy, according to the PGRO’s research and...
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