Straw for muck - allocation of costs within a business

BBE

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Sorry if this has been done before. How do people allocate costs to enterprise, i.e. baling, carting of straw to livestock, carting muck, spreading to arable? What about mucking out? Is value considered cost neutral? Didn't know if this should be posted in Cropping or Livestock as I'm sure it's viewed very differently for each.
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Baling and carting straw to livestock. Carting and spreading muck to the arable. That’s the simplest way if you struggle to separate the mucking out from carting and spreading.

The value of the muck varies with age, type, distance hauled and whether it is tipped in the field for spreading later. Typically a 6-9 month midden in the field is worth approximately £5/t spread which is about the cost of the operations. Your arable profit is the organic matter. The £5/t is based on P and K plus a tiny bit of N available to the following crop, not 100% of every nutrient.
 

puppet

Member
Livestock Farmer
Location
sw scotland
Within a business should be as if you are contracting to anyone else.
Diary, timesheet and a value put on the product.
As long as your accountant can justify it to HMRC then your figures will be OK as the money is not actually leaving your overall business. Is that correct?
 

BBE

Member
Mixed Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
Within a business should be as if you are contracting to anyone else.
Diary, timesheet and a value put on the product.
As long as your accountant can justify it to HMRC then your figures will be OK as the money is not actually leaving your overall business. Is that correct?
I'm only thinking about it for benchmarking really, just trying to get it relatively accurate (y)
 

Brisel

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
North Yorkshire
I do a straw 4 muck deal with a neighbouring pig farm and no money or invoices change hands . He has free straw , I get free muck .
Never been asked by accountants or anything .
What kind of exchange rate is it? 6t muck for 1 t straw? 1 acre of straw for 10t of muck?
 
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D14

Member
Sorry if this has been done before. How do people allocate costs to enterprise, i.e. baling, carting of straw to livestock, carting muck, spreading to arable? What about mucking out? Is value considered cost neutral? Didn't know if this should be posted in Cropping or Livestock as I'm sure it's viewed very differently for each.
A straight swap is no different to chopping straw from the arable farmers point of view. If you chop your straw then theres no baling, stacking costs etc. So the livestock farmer bales, stacks and hauls the straw.
The muck side of things just reduces your fert bill. If its a straight swap there is no need to allocate anything but you collect it and spread it.
 

silverfox

Member
Location
Shropshire
What kind of exchange rate is it? 6t muck for 1 t straw? 1 acre of straw for 10t of muck?
It’s never been established. We just let him have as much straw as he needs to fill his barn, usually about 100 acres worth, then I have it all back with pig muck attached .
I also get slurry which he pays contractors to spread , so no cost to me .
 

snarling bee

Member
Arable Farmer
Location
Bedfordshire
We bale about 150 acres of winter cereal straw and get 100 acres worth of muck at 35t/ha. We don't charge the pig enterprise for anything, but perhaps we should be more realistic and at least charge the baling.
 
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Chae1

Member
Location
Aberdeenshire
I just do straw for muck. No money changes hands within the business for straw. I do charge the livestock business for baling it though. Arable side pays to spread it.
 
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db9go

Member
Location
Buckinghamshire
Sorry if this has been done before. How do people allocate costs to enterprise, i.e. baling, carting of straw to livestock, carting muck, spreading to arable? What about mucking out? Is value considered cost neutral? Didn't know if this should be posted in Cropping or Livestock as I'm sure it's viewed very differently for each.
Chop the straw and let him keep the B G at his place
 

l'ordinary bonville

Member
BASE UK Member
Location
N Yorks
Our pigs pay for contractor baling and a charge is applied from the arable for leading straw in and leading muck out over the winter. Nominal £50/hr for the man and tractor.

The arable pays for spreading muck, whether done in house or contractor.

Slurry applied in the autumn is charged to the pigs, applied in the spring is not charged. Tractor and tanker £70/hr or £1.75/m3

Having said that, the days of autumn spreading of muck or slurry are numbered if EA get their way so all muck and slurry will be applied in the spring and charged to the arable side. All storage and moving will be charged to the pigs
 

Rejuvenating swards: Which option is best?

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Written by Brian McDonnell

Maintaining grass quality during mid-season grazing is important. Farmers can maintain quality by entering ideal grazing covers of 1,300 – 1,500kg DM/ha, and grazing down to a residual of 4cm every rotation.

If you are now in a situation where cows are not cleaning out paddocks as well as they should be, leading to the development of steamy grass within the sward, here are some options.

Common options for rejuvenating swards include:

  1. Take a silage cut, probably into bales, remove the material and start again with the aftermath...
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